Relationship of health behavior theories with self-efficacy among insufficiently active hypertensive African-American women

Michelle Martin, Sharina D. Person, Polly Kratt, Heather Prayor-Patterson, Young Kim, Maribel Salas, Maria Pisu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: While self-efficacy plays an important role in physical activity, relatively little research has examined this construct in minorities. This study identified theoretical correlates associated with self-efficacy among insufficiently active, hypertensive Black women. Methods: Correlates of self-efficacy to: (1) overcoming barriers to physical activity; (2) making time for activity; and (3) "sticking with" physical activity were studied. Results: Sixty-one women (M = 50.48 ± 4.2 years) participated. We accounted for 32% of the variance in confidence in overcoming barriers. Women confident in overcoming barriers reported less worry about physical activity. The TTM processes of change were also in the model: consciousness raising, environmental reevaluation, counter conditioning, and self-liberation. We accounted for 16% of the variance in "making time" self-efficacy. An aversiveness barrier (e.g., physical activity is boring, physical activity is hard work) was the dominant variable in the model. Confidence to 'stick with' physical activity was associated with self-reevaluation (i.e., reflection on how personal values correspond to behavior). Social support and competing demands were not associated with self-efficacy. Conclusions: Consistent with Social Cognitive Theory, results suggest that self-efficacy is behavior specific and each measure likely provides unique information. Practice implications: Interventions should be tailored to address specific self-efficacy types.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-145
Number of pages9
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2008

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Health Behavior
Self Efficacy
African Americans
Exercise
Consciousness
Social Support
Theoretical Models
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Relationship of health behavior theories with self-efficacy among insufficiently active hypertensive African-American women. / Martin, Michelle; Person, Sharina D.; Kratt, Polly; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Kim, Young; Salas, Maribel; Pisu, Maria.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 72, No. 1, 01.07.2008, p. 137-145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, Michelle ; Person, Sharina D. ; Kratt, Polly ; Prayor-Patterson, Heather ; Kim, Young ; Salas, Maribel ; Pisu, Maria. / Relationship of health behavior theories with self-efficacy among insufficiently active hypertensive African-American women. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2008 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 137-145.
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