Relationship of peak systolic pressure/end systolic volume ratio to standard ejection phase indices and ventricular function curves in coronary disease

K Ramanathan, S. W. Erwin, J. M. Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to determine the relationship of the peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume (PSP/ESV) ratio to standard ejection phase indices [ejection fraction (EF), mean normalized systolic ejection rate (MNSER), mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (V(cf))], and ventricular function curves (VFC), hemodynamic and angiographic studies were carried out in 38 subjects: 11 normal controls (Group I) and 27 with coronary artery disease (CAD). The CAD patients were subdivided into those without (Group II) and those with (Group III) regional asynergy. EF, MNSER and V(cf) were calculated from the ventriculogram using standard formulae. The slope of the left ventricular function curve was constructed by determining left ventricular stroke work index and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure before and after ventriculography, and dividing the change in the left ventricular stroke work index by the change in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Peak systolic left ventricular pressure was determined before left ventriculography; minimal systolic volume was measured from the left ventriculogram. PSP/ESV ratio in the control group (Group I) was 6.4 ± 2.8. This differed significantly from the ratio in patients (Group II) with CAD but without asynergy (4.7 ± 2.2 p < 0.025) and from that in patients (Group III) with CAD and asynergy (2.4 ± 1.4, p < 0.001). In contrast, standard ejection phase indices (EF, MNSER and V(cf)) and VFC's in Group I showed no significant change from Group II but differed significantly from Group III (EF 0.74 ± 0.09 vs 0.54 ± 0.16, p < 0.001; MNSER 2.51 ± 0.046 vs 1.6 ± 0.53, p < 0.001; V(cf) 1.58 ± 0.31 vs 0.94 ± 0.39, p < 0.001; VFC 3.6 ± 3.5 vs 1.7 ± 2.4 p < 0.01). When subjects from all three groups were included, the PSP/ESV ratio correlated well with all the standard ejection phase indices: with EF, r = 0.73, p < 0.01; with MNSER, r = 0.69, p < 0.01; with V(cf) (r = 0.55, p < 0.01); but less so with VFC (r = 0.41, p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into subgroups the correlations remained significant for EF (Group I, r = 0.70, p < 0.05; Group II, r = 0.64, p < 0.05; Group III, r = 0.72, p < 0.005). In contrast, MNSER and PSP/ESV failed to correlate significantly in Group I, and V(cf) and PSP/ESV in all three subgroups. Only Group III showed a significant correlation between VFC and PSP/ESV (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the PSP/ESV ratio detects subtle changes in left ventricular function in the absence of significant alterations in other ejection phase indices or in left ventricular hemodynamics. The PSP/ESV ratio correlates best with EF and least well with the slope of the left ventricular function curve.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume288
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

Fingerprint

Ventricular Function
Coronary Disease
Blood Pressure
Coronary Artery Disease
Left Ventricular Function
Hemodynamics
Stroke
Control Groups
Ventricular Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{dfa7b27fdded4c48aa94447fa63c227e,
title = "Relationship of peak systolic pressure/end systolic volume ratio to standard ejection phase indices and ventricular function curves in coronary disease",
abstract = "In order to determine the relationship of the peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume (PSP/ESV) ratio to standard ejection phase indices [ejection fraction (EF), mean normalized systolic ejection rate (MNSER), mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (V(cf))], and ventricular function curves (VFC), hemodynamic and angiographic studies were carried out in 38 subjects: 11 normal controls (Group I) and 27 with coronary artery disease (CAD). The CAD patients were subdivided into those without (Group II) and those with (Group III) regional asynergy. EF, MNSER and V(cf) were calculated from the ventriculogram using standard formulae. The slope of the left ventricular function curve was constructed by determining left ventricular stroke work index and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure before and after ventriculography, and dividing the change in the left ventricular stroke work index by the change in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Peak systolic left ventricular pressure was determined before left ventriculography; minimal systolic volume was measured from the left ventriculogram. PSP/ESV ratio in the control group (Group I) was 6.4 ± 2.8. This differed significantly from the ratio in patients (Group II) with CAD but without asynergy (4.7 ± 2.2 p < 0.025) and from that in patients (Group III) with CAD and asynergy (2.4 ± 1.4, p < 0.001). In contrast, standard ejection phase indices (EF, MNSER and V(cf)) and VFC's in Group I showed no significant change from Group II but differed significantly from Group III (EF 0.74 ± 0.09 vs 0.54 ± 0.16, p < 0.001; MNSER 2.51 ± 0.046 vs 1.6 ± 0.53, p < 0.001; V(cf) 1.58 ± 0.31 vs 0.94 ± 0.39, p < 0.001; VFC 3.6 ± 3.5 vs 1.7 ± 2.4 p < 0.01). When subjects from all three groups were included, the PSP/ESV ratio correlated well with all the standard ejection phase indices: with EF, r = 0.73, p < 0.01; with MNSER, r = 0.69, p < 0.01; with V(cf) (r = 0.55, p < 0.01); but less so with VFC (r = 0.41, p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into subgroups the correlations remained significant for EF (Group I, r = 0.70, p < 0.05; Group II, r = 0.64, p < 0.05; Group III, r = 0.72, p < 0.005). In contrast, MNSER and PSP/ESV failed to correlate significantly in Group I, and V(cf) and PSP/ESV in all three subgroups. Only Group III showed a significant correlation between VFC and PSP/ESV (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the PSP/ESV ratio detects subtle changes in left ventricular function in the absence of significant alterations in other ejection phase indices or in left ventricular hemodynamics. The PSP/ESV ratio correlates best with EF and least well with the slope of the left ventricular function curve.",
author = "K Ramanathan and Erwin, {S. W.} and Sullivan, {J. M.}",
year = "1984",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00000441-198411000-00003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "288",
pages = "162--168",
journal = "American Journal of the Medical Sciences",
issn = "0002-9629",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship of peak systolic pressure/end systolic volume ratio to standard ejection phase indices and ventricular function curves in coronary disease

AU - Ramanathan, K

AU - Erwin, S. W.

AU - Sullivan, J. M.

PY - 1984/1/1

Y1 - 1984/1/1

N2 - In order to determine the relationship of the peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume (PSP/ESV) ratio to standard ejection phase indices [ejection fraction (EF), mean normalized systolic ejection rate (MNSER), mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (V(cf))], and ventricular function curves (VFC), hemodynamic and angiographic studies were carried out in 38 subjects: 11 normal controls (Group I) and 27 with coronary artery disease (CAD). The CAD patients were subdivided into those without (Group II) and those with (Group III) regional asynergy. EF, MNSER and V(cf) were calculated from the ventriculogram using standard formulae. The slope of the left ventricular function curve was constructed by determining left ventricular stroke work index and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure before and after ventriculography, and dividing the change in the left ventricular stroke work index by the change in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Peak systolic left ventricular pressure was determined before left ventriculography; minimal systolic volume was measured from the left ventriculogram. PSP/ESV ratio in the control group (Group I) was 6.4 ± 2.8. This differed significantly from the ratio in patients (Group II) with CAD but without asynergy (4.7 ± 2.2 p < 0.025) and from that in patients (Group III) with CAD and asynergy (2.4 ± 1.4, p < 0.001). In contrast, standard ejection phase indices (EF, MNSER and V(cf)) and VFC's in Group I showed no significant change from Group II but differed significantly from Group III (EF 0.74 ± 0.09 vs 0.54 ± 0.16, p < 0.001; MNSER 2.51 ± 0.046 vs 1.6 ± 0.53, p < 0.001; V(cf) 1.58 ± 0.31 vs 0.94 ± 0.39, p < 0.001; VFC 3.6 ± 3.5 vs 1.7 ± 2.4 p < 0.01). When subjects from all three groups were included, the PSP/ESV ratio correlated well with all the standard ejection phase indices: with EF, r = 0.73, p < 0.01; with MNSER, r = 0.69, p < 0.01; with V(cf) (r = 0.55, p < 0.01); but less so with VFC (r = 0.41, p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into subgroups the correlations remained significant for EF (Group I, r = 0.70, p < 0.05; Group II, r = 0.64, p < 0.05; Group III, r = 0.72, p < 0.005). In contrast, MNSER and PSP/ESV failed to correlate significantly in Group I, and V(cf) and PSP/ESV in all three subgroups. Only Group III showed a significant correlation between VFC and PSP/ESV (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the PSP/ESV ratio detects subtle changes in left ventricular function in the absence of significant alterations in other ejection phase indices or in left ventricular hemodynamics. The PSP/ESV ratio correlates best with EF and least well with the slope of the left ventricular function curve.

AB - In order to determine the relationship of the peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume (PSP/ESV) ratio to standard ejection phase indices [ejection fraction (EF), mean normalized systolic ejection rate (MNSER), mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (V(cf))], and ventricular function curves (VFC), hemodynamic and angiographic studies were carried out in 38 subjects: 11 normal controls (Group I) and 27 with coronary artery disease (CAD). The CAD patients were subdivided into those without (Group II) and those with (Group III) regional asynergy. EF, MNSER and V(cf) were calculated from the ventriculogram using standard formulae. The slope of the left ventricular function curve was constructed by determining left ventricular stroke work index and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure before and after ventriculography, and dividing the change in the left ventricular stroke work index by the change in the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure. Peak systolic left ventricular pressure was determined before left ventriculography; minimal systolic volume was measured from the left ventriculogram. PSP/ESV ratio in the control group (Group I) was 6.4 ± 2.8. This differed significantly from the ratio in patients (Group II) with CAD but without asynergy (4.7 ± 2.2 p < 0.025) and from that in patients (Group III) with CAD and asynergy (2.4 ± 1.4, p < 0.001). In contrast, standard ejection phase indices (EF, MNSER and V(cf)) and VFC's in Group I showed no significant change from Group II but differed significantly from Group III (EF 0.74 ± 0.09 vs 0.54 ± 0.16, p < 0.001; MNSER 2.51 ± 0.046 vs 1.6 ± 0.53, p < 0.001; V(cf) 1.58 ± 0.31 vs 0.94 ± 0.39, p < 0.001; VFC 3.6 ± 3.5 vs 1.7 ± 2.4 p < 0.01). When subjects from all three groups were included, the PSP/ESV ratio correlated well with all the standard ejection phase indices: with EF, r = 0.73, p < 0.01; with MNSER, r = 0.69, p < 0.01; with V(cf) (r = 0.55, p < 0.01); but less so with VFC (r = 0.41, p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into subgroups the correlations remained significant for EF (Group I, r = 0.70, p < 0.05; Group II, r = 0.64, p < 0.05; Group III, r = 0.72, p < 0.005). In contrast, MNSER and PSP/ESV failed to correlate significantly in Group I, and V(cf) and PSP/ESV in all three subgroups. Only Group III showed a significant correlation between VFC and PSP/ESV (r = 0.57, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that the PSP/ESV ratio detects subtle changes in left ventricular function in the absence of significant alterations in other ejection phase indices or in left ventricular hemodynamics. The PSP/ESV ratio correlates best with EF and least well with the slope of the left ventricular function curve.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0021740189&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0021740189&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00000441-198411000-00003

DO - 10.1097/00000441-198411000-00003

M3 - Article

VL - 288

SP - 162

EP - 168

JO - American Journal of the Medical Sciences

JF - American Journal of the Medical Sciences

SN - 0002-9629

IS - 4

ER -