Relationship of serum iron and nonprotein-bound iron concentrations following administration of ferrous sulfate in pigs

Peter Chyka, Timothy D. Mandrell, Joseph E. Holley, Bryan E. Beegle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

A prospective analytical study was conducted to determine the relationship between nonprotein-bound iron and serum iron concentrations following gastric instillation of ferrous sulfate. Four female pigs (2022 kg) with indwelling central venous lines and gastrostomy tubes were studied. A 5% solution of ferrous sulfate (20 mg elemental iron/kg bwt) was administered through the gastrostomy tube over 1 to 2 min. Six hourly blood samples were collected, and serum samples were subjected to ultrafiltration with the filtrate representing nonprotein-bound iron. Iron concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Baseline (mean ± SD) iron concentrations were 73 ± 25 μg/dL as the Serum total and 21 ± 4 μg/dL as nonprotein-bound iron. The serum iron and nonprotein-bound iron concentrations achieved apeak of 191 ± 66 and 23 ± 10, respectively, at 2 h and declined to near baseline values at 6 h. The mean ratio of filtrate to serum iron concentration was 0.16 ± 0.08 and ranged from 0.08 to 0.29. Nonprotein-boundiron did not increase as the serum iron concentration increased (r = 0.18) within the ranges achieved in the study. The absence of protein, particularly transferrin and albumin, was verified by electrophoresis.A form of apparent nonprotein-bound iron was isolated from serum by ultrafiltration and its concentration was relatively constant despite the rise and fall of total serum iron concentrations during the 6 h. These observations warrant further investigation to understand the development of toxicity in acute iron poisoning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-26
Number of pages3
JournalVeterinary and Human Toxicology
Volume38
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1996

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ferrous sulfate
blood serum
Swine
Iron
iron
swine
Serum
Gastrostomy
filtrates
Ultrafiltration
ultrafiltration

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Toxicology
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Relationship of serum iron and nonprotein-bound iron concentrations following administration of ferrous sulfate in pigs. / Chyka, Peter; Mandrell, Timothy D.; Holley, Joseph E.; Beegle, Bryan E.

In: Veterinary and Human Toxicology, Vol. 38, No. 1, 02.1996, p. 24-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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