Relative bioavailability of carnitine supplementation in premature neonates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Carnitine is an important nutrient in the infant diet. We compared total plasma carnitine concentrations in premature neonates supplemented with carnitine via parenteral and enteral nutrition. Methods: This is a post hoc analysis of plasma total carnitine concentrations and carnitine intake in neonates randomized in a previous study to receive 20 mg/kg/d carnitine supplementation over 8 weeks. Neonates received L-carnitine initially via parenteral nutrition (PN). When neonates were fed enterally, oral supplementation of L-carnitine was given in divided doses with each feeding. Results: Sixteen neonates (27 ± 2 weeks gestation; 2.9 ± 1.0 days postnatal age at enrollment; 965.6 ± 279.1 g birth weight) are included. Concentrations were below reference range (31.1-60.5 nmol/mL) at baseline and exceeded reference range from week 1 through the last study period. Concentrations were not different from week 1 (108 ± 49) through weeks 4 (87 ± 34) and 8 (83 ± 31). Carnitine intakes and concentrations were compared in neonates receiving 100% parenteral carnitine at week 1 (n = 6) and 100% enteral carnitine at week 8 (n = 8). Concentrations at week 1 (100.1 ± 27.9) were not different (p = .19) from week 8 (78.6 ± 29.3); an estimate of relative bioavailability was 78.6%. Bioavailability with paired analysis of neonates (n = 5) receiving 100% parenteral carnitine at week 1 and 100% enteral carnitine at week 8 was 83.7% ± 41.2% (30.1%-140.6%). Conclusions: Parenteral and enteral supplementation of 20 mg/kg/d carnitine results in plasma total carnitine concentrations that exceed the reference range. Concentrations are not different between parenteral to enteral supplementation, suggesting that enteral carnitine is well absorbed when given daily in divided doses with enteral feedings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)421-425
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Carnitine
carnitine
Biological Availability
bioavailability
neonates
Newborn Infant
Small Intestine
Reference Values
Parenteral Nutrition
enteral feeding
Enteral Nutrition
parenteral feeding
dosage
Birth Weight
birth weight

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Relative bioavailability of carnitine supplementation in premature neonates. / Herrington, Catherine; Christensen, Michael; Storm, Michael C.; Helms, Richard.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 30, No. 5, 01.12.2006, p. 421-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Carnitine is an important nutrient in the infant diet. We compared total plasma carnitine concentrations in premature neonates supplemented with carnitine via parenteral and enteral nutrition. Methods: This is a post hoc analysis of plasma total carnitine concentrations and carnitine intake in neonates randomized in a previous study to receive 20 mg/kg/d carnitine supplementation over 8 weeks. Neonates received L-carnitine initially via parenteral nutrition (PN). When neonates were fed enterally, oral supplementation of L-carnitine was given in divided doses with each feeding. Results: Sixteen neonates (27 ± 2 weeks gestation; 2.9 ± 1.0 days postnatal age at enrollment; 965.6 ± 279.1 g birth weight) are included. Concentrations were below reference range (31.1-60.5 nmol/mL) at baseline and exceeded reference range from week 1 through the last study period. Concentrations were not different from week 1 (108 ± 49) through weeks 4 (87 ± 34) and 8 (83 ± 31). Carnitine intakes and concentrations were compared in neonates receiving 100{\%} parenteral carnitine at week 1 (n = 6) and 100{\%} enteral carnitine at week 8 (n = 8). Concentrations at week 1 (100.1 ± 27.9) were not different (p = .19) from week 8 (78.6 ± 29.3); an estimate of relative bioavailability was 78.6{\%}. Bioavailability with paired analysis of neonates (n = 5) receiving 100{\%} parenteral carnitine at week 1 and 100{\%} enteral carnitine at week 8 was 83.7{\%} ± 41.2{\%} (30.1{\%}-140.6{\%}). Conclusions: Parenteral and enteral supplementation of 20 mg/kg/d carnitine results in plasma total carnitine concentrations that exceed the reference range. Concentrations are not different between parenteral to enteral supplementation, suggesting that enteral carnitine is well absorbed when given daily in divided doses with enteral feedings.",
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N2 - Background: Carnitine is an important nutrient in the infant diet. We compared total plasma carnitine concentrations in premature neonates supplemented with carnitine via parenteral and enteral nutrition. Methods: This is a post hoc analysis of plasma total carnitine concentrations and carnitine intake in neonates randomized in a previous study to receive 20 mg/kg/d carnitine supplementation over 8 weeks. Neonates received L-carnitine initially via parenteral nutrition (PN). When neonates were fed enterally, oral supplementation of L-carnitine was given in divided doses with each feeding. Results: Sixteen neonates (27 ± 2 weeks gestation; 2.9 ± 1.0 days postnatal age at enrollment; 965.6 ± 279.1 g birth weight) are included. Concentrations were below reference range (31.1-60.5 nmol/mL) at baseline and exceeded reference range from week 1 through the last study period. Concentrations were not different from week 1 (108 ± 49) through weeks 4 (87 ± 34) and 8 (83 ± 31). Carnitine intakes and concentrations were compared in neonates receiving 100% parenteral carnitine at week 1 (n = 6) and 100% enteral carnitine at week 8 (n = 8). Concentrations at week 1 (100.1 ± 27.9) were not different (p = .19) from week 8 (78.6 ± 29.3); an estimate of relative bioavailability was 78.6%. Bioavailability with paired analysis of neonates (n = 5) receiving 100% parenteral carnitine at week 1 and 100% enteral carnitine at week 8 was 83.7% ± 41.2% (30.1%-140.6%). Conclusions: Parenteral and enteral supplementation of 20 mg/kg/d carnitine results in plasma total carnitine concentrations that exceed the reference range. Concentrations are not different between parenteral to enteral supplementation, suggesting that enteral carnitine is well absorbed when given daily in divided doses with enteral feedings.

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