Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology

Giancarlo Vanini, Helen Baghdoyan, Ralph Lydic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although general anesthetics are used for approximately 21 million patients per year in the United States, the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which anesthetics produce loss of waking consciousness are poorly understood. The complexity of consciousness and relatively imprecise clinical signs that are used to evaluate the depth of anesthesia are significant limitations for the study of consciousness. Recent advances in sleep neurobiology continue to enhance the understanding of different physiological traits that define altered states of consciousness. The original hypothesis that neural networks that evolved to generate sleep are preferentially modulated by anesthetic drugs has been supported by multiple lines of evidence. These data demonstrate that sleep neurobiology can contribute to understanding the mechanisms by which anesthetics cause loss of consciousness. The goal of this chapter is to selectively review the neurobiology of sleep and wakefulness in relation to anesthesia-induced loss of consciousness. In the early 1900s, the observation of localized injuries in the brains of patients that had suffered “encephalitis lethargica” led Constantine von Economo to propose that the anterior hypothalamus functions as a sleep center and the posterior hypothalamus functions as a wake center. Possibly inspired by von Economo's observations, and based on his own brain transection studies (cerveau and encéphale isolé, reviewed in Steriade and McCarley), the neurophysiologist Frédéric Bremer postulated that sleep was a passive process resulting from the cessation of external sensory stimulation(“deafferentation”).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConsciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages1-23
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9780511676291
ISBN (Print)9780521518222
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Anesthesiology
Neurobiology
Sleep
Unconsciousness
Consciousness
Anesthetics
Anesthesia
Posterior Hypothalamus
Anterior Hypothalamus
General Anesthetics
Wakefulness
Encephalitis
Brain Injuries
Cognitive Neuroscience
Observation
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Vanini, G., Baghdoyan, H., & Lydic, R. (2010). Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology. In Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia (pp. 1-23). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511676291.002

Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology. / Vanini, Giancarlo; Baghdoyan, Helen; Lydic, Ralph.

Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia. Cambridge University Press, 2010. p. 1-23.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Vanini, G, Baghdoyan, H & Lydic, R 2010, Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology. in Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia. Cambridge University Press, pp. 1-23. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511676291.002
Vanini G, Baghdoyan H, Lydic R. Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology. In Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia. Cambridge University Press. 2010. p. 1-23 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511676291.002
Vanini, Giancarlo ; Baghdoyan, Helen ; Lydic, Ralph. / Relevance of sleep neurobiology for cognitive neuroscience and anesthesiology. Consciousness, Awareness, and Anesthesia. Cambridge University Press, 2010. pp. 1-23
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