Religion, social capital, and health

Karen Hye Cheon Kim Yeary, Songthip Ounpraseuth, Page Moore, Zoran Bursac, Paul Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Religion's association with better physical health has been partially explained by health behaviors, psychosocial variables, and biological factors; but these factors do not fully explain the religion-health connection. In concert with the religion and health literature, a burgeoning literature has linked social capital with salubrious health outcomes. Religious organizations are recognized in the social capital literature as producers and facilitators of social capital. However, few studies have examined the potential mediating role of social capital in the religion-health relationship. Thus data from the 2006 Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey were analyzed for 10,828 adults. The composite unstandardized indirect effect from religion to social capital onto health was significant (β = 0.098; p<0.001). The unstandardized direct pathway from religion to self-reported health (β = 0.015; p = 0.336) indicated that social capital is a mediator in the religion-health relationship. Among the demographic variables investigated, only age and income had a significant direct effect on self-reported health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-347
Number of pages17
JournalReview of Religious Research
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

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Health
Religion
Social Capital
Mediator
Benchmark
Income
Religious Organizations
Demographics
Physical Health
Pathway

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Religious studies
  • Philosophy

Cite this

Yeary, K. H. C. K., Ounpraseuth, S., Moore, P., Bursac, Z., & Greene, P. (2012). Religion, social capital, and health. Review of Religious Research, 54(3), 331-347. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13644-011-0048-8

Religion, social capital, and health. / Yeary, Karen Hye Cheon Kim; Ounpraseuth, Songthip; Moore, Page; Bursac, Zoran; Greene, Paul.

In: Review of Religious Research, Vol. 54, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 331-347.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yeary, KHCK, Ounpraseuth, S, Moore, P, Bursac, Z & Greene, P 2012, 'Religion, social capital, and health', Review of Religious Research, vol. 54, no. 3, pp. 331-347. https://doi.org/10.1007/s13644-011-0048-8
Yeary, Karen Hye Cheon Kim ; Ounpraseuth, Songthip ; Moore, Page ; Bursac, Zoran ; Greene, Paul. / Religion, social capital, and health. In: Review of Religious Research. 2012 ; Vol. 54, No. 3. pp. 331-347.
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