Religiosity and Excess Weight Among African-American Adolescents

The Jackson Heart KIDS Study

Marino A. Bruce, Bettina M. Beech, Tanganyika Wilder, Elvin Burton, Jylana L. Sheats, Keith C. Norris, Roland J. Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent studies suggest that religion and spirituality can yield health benefits for young African-Americans. We examined the relationship between religious practices, spirituality, and excess weight among African-American adolescents (N = 212) residing in the Deep South. Results from modified Poisson regression analysis indicate that adolescents who prayed daily had a lower prevalence of excess weight (PR 0.77 [95% CI 0.62–0.96]) than those who did not. This relationship was only significant for 12–15 year-old participants in age-stratified analysis. These findings suggest that preventive interventions offered to children and younger adolescents can have implications for weight status across the lifespan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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African Americans
Spirituality
Weights and Measures
Religion
Insurance Benefits
Regression Analysis
Excess
Religiosity
Health
Life Span
Religious Practices

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Religiosity and Excess Weight Among African-American Adolescents : The Jackson Heart KIDS Study. / Bruce, Marino A.; Beech, Bettina M.; Wilder, Tanganyika; Burton, Elvin; Sheats, Jylana L.; Norris, Keith C.; Thorpe, Roland J.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bruce, Marino A. ; Beech, Bettina M. ; Wilder, Tanganyika ; Burton, Elvin ; Sheats, Jylana L. ; Norris, Keith C. ; Thorpe, Roland J. / Religiosity and Excess Weight Among African-American Adolescents : The Jackson Heart KIDS Study. In: Journal of Religion and Health. 2019.
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