Religiosity, Self-Efficacy for Exercise, and African American Women

Bridget K. Robinson, Mona Newsome Wicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)854-864
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
African Americans
Exercise
Aptitude
Internal-External Control
Leisure Activities
Health Promotion
Psychometrics
Health Status
Self-efficacy
African American Women
Religiosity
Health
Population
Physical Activity
Physical

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Religiosity, Self-Efficacy for Exercise, and African American Women. / Robinson, Bridget K.; Wicks, Mona Newsome.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.09.2012, p. 854-864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{edda76ff0d6a4e1bbddb1d1f5ed04221,
title = "Religiosity, Self-Efficacy for Exercise, and African American Women",
abstract = "Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration.",
author = "Robinson, {Bridget K.} and Wicks, {Mona Newsome}",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10943-010-9397-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "51",
pages = "854--864",
journal = "Journal of Religion and Health",
issn = "0022-4197",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic/Human Sciences Press Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Religiosity, Self-Efficacy for Exercise, and African American Women

AU - Robinson, Bridget K.

AU - Wicks, Mona Newsome

PY - 2012/9/1

Y1 - 2012/9/1

N2 - Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration.

AB - Physical inactivity among African American women persists despite health promotion efforts targeting this population. In the African American faith community, thinking patterns related to personal versus divine control over health status could affect self-efficacy beliefs and physical activity behavior. Religiosity, a determinate of self-efficacy for exercise, is influenced by culture. This exploratory pilot study assessed the psychometric properties and relevance of selected study instruments and relationships among the study variables in African American women recruited through a rural church. Findings indicated a trend toward significance among study variables and that the God Locus of Health Control and Physical Exercise Self-Efficacy Scales were reliable for capturing attitudes about ability to engage in physical activity and religiosity in this sample. Six of the twenty-five women recruited failed to complete the Stanford Brief Activity Survey for Work and Leisure Time Activity correctly, suggesting the need to revise instructions prior to future instrument administration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84866524185&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84866524185&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10943-010-9397-9

DO - 10.1007/s10943-010-9397-9

M3 - Article

C2 - 20842529

AN - SCOPUS:84866524185

VL - 51

SP - 854

EP - 864

JO - Journal of Religion and Health

JF - Journal of Religion and Health

SN - 0022-4197

IS - 3

ER -