REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons

Highlights from 1999 to 2009

Christopher J. Watson, Helen Baghdoyan, Ralph Lydic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioral state initiated and maintained by the interaction of multiple neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine. Numerous studies confirm that cholinergic transmission contributes to the regulation of REM sleep. Cholinergic signaling in the basal forebrain modulates the cortical activation that occurs during REM sleep. It is also well documented that cholinergic transmission in the pontine reticular formation plays a role in REM-sleep generation and maintenance. This chapter highlights evidence supporting that acetylcholine regulates REM sleep and focuses on the mechanisms that regulate cholinergic transmission within arousal-regulating brain regions. The chapter also considers how other arousal-regulating neurotransmitters, such as hypocretin, GABA, adenosine, and opioids modulate both cholinergic signaling and REM sleep. A greater understanding of how neurotransmitter interactions regulate REM sleep will further clarify the role of cholinergic transmission in REM-sleep generation. Employing new analytical techniques will facilitate understanding the effects of multiple neurotransmitter interactions on physiologically relevant time scales. Capillary electrophoresis and biosensors, which can quantify neurochemical changes on the order of seconds, will allow insights that could not be achieved with more conventional sampling techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRapid Eye Movement Sleep
Subtitle of host publicationRegulation and Function
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages194-205
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780511921179
ISBN (Print)9780521116800
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cholinergic Neurons
REM Sleep
Sleep
Cholinergic Agents
Neurotransmitter Agents
Arousal
Acetylcholine
Capillary Electrophoresis
Biosensing Techniques
Adenosine
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Opioid Analgesics
Maintenance
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Watson, C. J., Baghdoyan, H., & Lydic, R. (2011). REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons: Highlights from 1999 to 2009. In Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function (pp. 194-205). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022

REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons : Highlights from 1999 to 2009. / Watson, Christopher J.; Baghdoyan, Helen; Lydic, Ralph.

Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, 2011. p. 194-205.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Watson, CJ, Baghdoyan, H & Lydic, R 2011, REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons: Highlights from 1999 to 2009. in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, pp. 194-205. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022
Watson CJ, Baghdoyan H, Lydic R. REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons: Highlights from 1999 to 2009. In Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press. 2011. p. 194-205 https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022
Watson, Christopher J. ; Baghdoyan, Helen ; Lydic, Ralph. / REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons : Highlights from 1999 to 2009. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep: Regulation and Function. Cambridge University Press, 2011. pp. 194-205
@inbook{0e8c1361c80c4eb99b7635110a78308b,
title = "REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons: Highlights from 1999 to 2009",
abstract = "Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioral state initiated and maintained by the interaction of multiple neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine. Numerous studies confirm that cholinergic transmission contributes to the regulation of REM sleep. Cholinergic signaling in the basal forebrain modulates the cortical activation that occurs during REM sleep. It is also well documented that cholinergic transmission in the pontine reticular formation plays a role in REM-sleep generation and maintenance. This chapter highlights evidence supporting that acetylcholine regulates REM sleep and focuses on the mechanisms that regulate cholinergic transmission within arousal-regulating brain regions. The chapter also considers how other arousal-regulating neurotransmitters, such as hypocretin, GABA, adenosine, and opioids modulate both cholinergic signaling and REM sleep. A greater understanding of how neurotransmitter interactions regulate REM sleep will further clarify the role of cholinergic transmission in REM-sleep generation. Employing new analytical techniques will facilitate understanding the effects of multiple neurotransmitter interactions on physiologically relevant time scales. Capillary electrophoresis and biosensors, which can quantify neurochemical changes on the order of seconds, will allow insights that could not be achieved with more conventional sampling techniques.",
author = "Watson, {Christopher J.} and Helen Baghdoyan and Ralph Lydic",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780521116800",
pages = "194--205",
booktitle = "Rapid Eye Movement Sleep",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - REM sleep regulation by cholinergic neurons

T2 - Highlights from 1999 to 2009

AU - Watson, Christopher J.

AU - Baghdoyan, Helen

AU - Lydic, Ralph

PY - 2011/1/1

Y1 - 2011/1/1

N2 - Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioral state initiated and maintained by the interaction of multiple neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine. Numerous studies confirm that cholinergic transmission contributes to the regulation of REM sleep. Cholinergic signaling in the basal forebrain modulates the cortical activation that occurs during REM sleep. It is also well documented that cholinergic transmission in the pontine reticular formation plays a role in REM-sleep generation and maintenance. This chapter highlights evidence supporting that acetylcholine regulates REM sleep and focuses on the mechanisms that regulate cholinergic transmission within arousal-regulating brain regions. The chapter also considers how other arousal-regulating neurotransmitters, such as hypocretin, GABA, adenosine, and opioids modulate both cholinergic signaling and REM sleep. A greater understanding of how neurotransmitter interactions regulate REM sleep will further clarify the role of cholinergic transmission in REM-sleep generation. Employing new analytical techniques will facilitate understanding the effects of multiple neurotransmitter interactions on physiologically relevant time scales. Capillary electrophoresis and biosensors, which can quantify neurochemical changes on the order of seconds, will allow insights that could not be achieved with more conventional sampling techniques.

AB - Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioral state initiated and maintained by the interaction of multiple neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine. Numerous studies confirm that cholinergic transmission contributes to the regulation of REM sleep. Cholinergic signaling in the basal forebrain modulates the cortical activation that occurs during REM sleep. It is also well documented that cholinergic transmission in the pontine reticular formation plays a role in REM-sleep generation and maintenance. This chapter highlights evidence supporting that acetylcholine regulates REM sleep and focuses on the mechanisms that regulate cholinergic transmission within arousal-regulating brain regions. The chapter also considers how other arousal-regulating neurotransmitters, such as hypocretin, GABA, adenosine, and opioids modulate both cholinergic signaling and REM sleep. A greater understanding of how neurotransmitter interactions regulate REM sleep will further clarify the role of cholinergic transmission in REM-sleep generation. Employing new analytical techniques will facilitate understanding the effects of multiple neurotransmitter interactions on physiologically relevant time scales. Capillary electrophoresis and biosensors, which can quantify neurochemical changes on the order of seconds, will allow insights that could not be achieved with more conventional sampling techniques.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861739231&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861739231&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022

DO - 10.1017/CBO9780511921179.022

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780521116800

SP - 194

EP - 205

BT - Rapid Eye Movement Sleep

PB - Cambridge University Press

ER -