Renal angiomyolipoma

E. E. Anderson, Paul Hatcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Renal angiomyolipomas (AML) are rare benign tumors composed of blood vessels, smooth muscle, and fat. These hamartomas occur in two distinct clinical settings depending on their association or non-association with tuberous sclerosis (TS). Renal AML associated with TS is identified at an earlier age (average age, 31 years), is slightly more common in women, and is manifested by small multifocal bilateral tumors. Renal AML not associated with TS is identified between ages 40 and 60, occurs predominantly in women, and is manifested by a unilateral large solitary tumor. Symptoms relate to hemorrhage into renal collecting system, renal parenchyma and retroperitoneum, or renal failure. An abdominal or flank mass may be palpable. Diagnosis relies on the demonstration of fat within the tumor, which is best identified by computed tomography and renal ultrasonography. Metachronous, contralateral development of renal AML is not unusual, therefore conservative management of renal AML has great merit. Surgical options include subselective renal arterial embolization, enucleation, partial nephrectomy, and nephrectomy depending on patient's age and general medical condition, size and location of the tumor, symptoms, status of the contralateral kidney, and renal function. Renal cell carcinoma has been reported in association with renal AML and usually develops as a de novo neoplasm. The distinction between renal cell carcinoma and AML can be achieved by computerized tomography and renal ultrasonography because renal cell carcinoma does not contain fat.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-236
Number of pages7
JournalProblems in Urology
Volume4
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Angiomyolipoma
Kidney
Tuberous Sclerosis
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Fats
Neoplasms
Nephrectomy
Ultrasonography
Tomography
Vascular Tissue Neoplasms
Hamartoma
Renal Insufficiency
Smooth Muscle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Anderson, E. E., & Hatcher, P. (1990). Renal angiomyolipoma. Problems in Urology, 4(2), 230-236.

Renal angiomyolipoma. / Anderson, E. E.; Hatcher, Paul.

In: Problems in Urology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.01.1990, p. 230-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, EE & Hatcher, P 1990, 'Renal angiomyolipoma', Problems in Urology, vol. 4, no. 2, pp. 230-236.
Anderson EE, Hatcher P. Renal angiomyolipoma. Problems in Urology. 1990 Jan 1;4(2):230-236.
Anderson, E. E. ; Hatcher, Paul. / Renal angiomyolipoma. In: Problems in Urology. 1990 ; Vol. 4, No. 2. pp. 230-236.
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