Renal cell carcinoma

Paul A. Godley, Kenneth Ataga

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The overall incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising, for reasons not fully explained by increased abdominal imaging. Risk factors associated with renal cell carcinoma include hypertension, smoking, increased body mass index, and diet. There is an inverse association of renal cell carcinoma risk with consumption of a variety of carotenes. In addition, increased red meat intake has been associated with increased risk. Partial nephrectomy may be as effective as radical nephrectomy as treatment for localized disease, and radiosurgery may be as effective as surgical resection in the management of brain metastases. Immunotherapy remains the mainstay for systemic treatment, with response rates between 5% and 20%. Survival in renal cell carcinoma is related to pathologic stage, nuclear grade, microscopic vascular invasion, DNA content, nuclear morphometry, and histologic pattern. In addition, patients with deletion (8p)/-8, +12, and +20 appear to have a worse prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)260-264
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Oncology
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Renal Cell Carcinoma
Nephrectomy
Radiosurgery
Carotenoids
Immunotherapy
Blood Vessels
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Neoplasm Metastasis
Diet
Hypertension
Survival
DNA
Incidence
Brain
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Renal cell carcinoma. / Godley, Paul A.; Ataga, Kenneth.

In: Current Opinion in Oncology, Vol. 12, No. 3, 01.12.2000, p. 260-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Godley, Paul A. ; Ataga, Kenneth. / Renal cell carcinoma. In: Current Opinion in Oncology. 2000 ; Vol. 12, No. 3. pp. 260-264.
@article{2231157f25714e76a87f2f2cdf2e772b,
title = "Renal cell carcinoma",
abstract = "The overall incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising, for reasons not fully explained by increased abdominal imaging. Risk factors associated with renal cell carcinoma include hypertension, smoking, increased body mass index, and diet. There is an inverse association of renal cell carcinoma risk with consumption of a variety of carotenes. In addition, increased red meat intake has been associated with increased risk. Partial nephrectomy may be as effective as radical nephrectomy as treatment for localized disease, and radiosurgery may be as effective as surgical resection in the management of brain metastases. Immunotherapy remains the mainstay for systemic treatment, with response rates between 5{\%} and 20{\%}. Survival in renal cell carcinoma is related to pathologic stage, nuclear grade, microscopic vascular invasion, DNA content, nuclear morphometry, and histologic pattern. In addition, patients with deletion (8p)/-8, +12, and +20 appear to have a worse prognosis.",
author = "Godley, {Paul A.} and Kenneth Ataga",
year = "2000",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00001622-200005000-00013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "260--264",
journal = "Current Opinion in Oncology",
issn = "1040-8746",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Renal cell carcinoma

AU - Godley, Paul A.

AU - Ataga, Kenneth

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - The overall incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising, for reasons not fully explained by increased abdominal imaging. Risk factors associated with renal cell carcinoma include hypertension, smoking, increased body mass index, and diet. There is an inverse association of renal cell carcinoma risk with consumption of a variety of carotenes. In addition, increased red meat intake has been associated with increased risk. Partial nephrectomy may be as effective as radical nephrectomy as treatment for localized disease, and radiosurgery may be as effective as surgical resection in the management of brain metastases. Immunotherapy remains the mainstay for systemic treatment, with response rates between 5% and 20%. Survival in renal cell carcinoma is related to pathologic stage, nuclear grade, microscopic vascular invasion, DNA content, nuclear morphometry, and histologic pattern. In addition, patients with deletion (8p)/-8, +12, and +20 appear to have a worse prognosis.

AB - The overall incidence of renal cell carcinoma is rising, for reasons not fully explained by increased abdominal imaging. Risk factors associated with renal cell carcinoma include hypertension, smoking, increased body mass index, and diet. There is an inverse association of renal cell carcinoma risk with consumption of a variety of carotenes. In addition, increased red meat intake has been associated with increased risk. Partial nephrectomy may be as effective as radical nephrectomy as treatment for localized disease, and radiosurgery may be as effective as surgical resection in the management of brain metastases. Immunotherapy remains the mainstay for systemic treatment, with response rates between 5% and 20%. Survival in renal cell carcinoma is related to pathologic stage, nuclear grade, microscopic vascular invasion, DNA content, nuclear morphometry, and histologic pattern. In addition, patients with deletion (8p)/-8, +12, and +20 appear to have a worse prognosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034526804&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034526804&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00001622-200005000-00013

DO - 10.1097/00001622-200005000-00013

M3 - Review article

VL - 12

SP - 260

EP - 264

JO - Current Opinion in Oncology

JF - Current Opinion in Oncology

SN - 1040-8746

IS - 3

ER -