Reoperation of the pancreas

Eunice Huang, Max Langham, Timothy Fabian

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Pancreatic pathology is rare in children. The most common neonatal diagnosis that may require surgical intervention is persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI). Fortunately, this disease is relatively uncommon, with an incidence of one in 50,000 newborns per year (1). In addition, many patients with this diagnosis can be adequately treated with aggressive medical therapy. Pancreatic neoplasms occur in children but are also quite rare. At St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 890 newly diagnosed patients with solid organ tumor were seen over the last 5 years. Only two of these patients had pancreatic tumors. Only one had a malignant tumor. Traumatic injury is the most common reason surgical intervention is required on the pancreas of a child. Accidental pancreatic injury is rare in infants, so child abuse must be considered in young children who present with injury in this location. Severe pancreatic trauma is most common in males over the age of 6 years old. These patients are often cared for by adult trauma surgeons. Epidemiology and personal experience, therefore, suggest that most pediatric surgeons will only operate on the pancreas sporadically throughout their careers. One result is that literature concerning management of many of the complications associated with pancreatic diagnoses and pancreatic surgeries in children is quite limited, and many recommendations for management of pancreatic problems have been developed from more extensive experience with adult patients, who suffer from different disease processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReoperative Pediatric Surgery
PublisherHumana Press
Pages367-383
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9781588297617
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

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Reoperation
Pancreas
Wounds and Injuries
Congenital Hyperinsulinism
Neoplasms
Child Abuse
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Epidemiology
Newborn Infant
Pediatrics
Pathology
Incidence
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Huang, E., Langham, M., & Fabian, T. (2008). Reoperation of the pancreas. In Reoperative Pediatric Surgery (pp. 367-383). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-071-7_21

Reoperation of the pancreas. / Huang, Eunice; Langham, Max; Fabian, Timothy.

Reoperative Pediatric Surgery. Humana Press, 2008. p. 367-383.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Huang, E, Langham, M & Fabian, T 2008, Reoperation of the pancreas. in Reoperative Pediatric Surgery. Humana Press, pp. 367-383. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-071-7_21
Huang E, Langham M, Fabian T. Reoperation of the pancreas. In Reoperative Pediatric Surgery. Humana Press. 2008. p. 367-383 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60327-071-7_21
Huang, Eunice ; Langham, Max ; Fabian, Timothy. / Reoperation of the pancreas. Reoperative Pediatric Surgery. Humana Press, 2008. pp. 367-383
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