Repair of compound-depressed skull fractures in children with replacement of bone fragments

James B. Blankenship, William M. Chadduck, Frederick Boop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective study of 31 consecutive cases of compound-depressed skull fractures treated by bone fragment replacement between October 1983 and August 1990 was performed. Epidemiology, clinical features, therapy, and outcome were examined and compared with previous series. A protocol is presented for bone fragment treatment intra-operatively and use of intravenous antibiotics (nafcillin and Claforan) perioperatively, despite the degree of wound contamination or dural violation. Of the 31 cases. 15 had dural lacerations with 4 of these requiring patching with pericranium. The degree of wound contamination varied, with only 8 cases considered clean. The average age of patients treated was 8.6 years. At follow-up (average of 26.5 months), all patients had solid bone fusions and well-healed wounds. There were no instances of wound infection or osteomyelitis. No patient required subsequent cranioplasty. It is proposed that bone fragment removal for compound-depressed skull fractures, regardless of the degree of contamination, the presence of dural laceration, or the degree of intracerebral injury, is not necessary and that bone fragment replacement avoids a second operation for cranioplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-300
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Neurosurgery
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Depressed Skull Fracture
Bone and Bones
Lacerations
Wounds and Injuries
Nafcillin
Cefotaxime
Wound Infection
Osteomyelitis
Epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Repair of compound-depressed skull fractures in children with replacement of bone fragments. / Blankenship, James B.; Chadduck, William M.; Boop, Frederick.

In: Pediatric Neurosurgery, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.01.1990, p. 297-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blankenship, James B. ; Chadduck, William M. ; Boop, Frederick. / Repair of compound-depressed skull fractures in children with replacement of bone fragments. In: Pediatric Neurosurgery. 1990 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 297-300.
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