Repeated injections of sulpiride into the medial prefrontal cortex induces sensitization to cocaine in rats

Jeffery Steketee, Timothy J. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: Recent studies have suggested that the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays an important role in the development of sensitization to cocaine. In particular, a recent report proposed that sensitization is associated with a decreased dopamine D2 receptor function in the mPFC. The present study was designed to further examine the involvement of mPFC dopamine D 2 receptors in cocaine sensitization. Objectives: The experiments described below sought to determine the effects of acute or repeated intra-mPFC injections of the dopamine D2 antagonist sulpiride on subsequent motor-stimulant and nucleus accumbens dopamine responses to cocaine. Methods: Rats received bilateral cannulae implants above the ventral mPFC for microinjections and above the nucleus accumbens for in vivo microdialysis. Initial studies examined the effects of intra-mPFC sulpiride pretreatment on the acute motor-stimulant and nucleus accumbens dopamine responses to cocaine. Follow-up studies determined the effects of repeated intra-mPFC sulpiride injections on subsequent behavioral and nucleus accumbens dopamine responses to a cocaine challenge. Results: Intra-mPFC sulpiride enhanced the cocaine-induced increases in motor activity and dopamine overflow in the nucleus accumbens. Repeated intra-mPFC sulpiride induced behavioral and neurochemical cross-sensitization to cocaine. Conclusions: The data support previous findings that sensitization is associated with a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor function in the mPFC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-760
Number of pages8
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume179
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2005

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Sulpiride
Prefrontal Cortex
Cocaine
Injections
Nucleus Accumbens
Dopamine
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Microdialysis
Microinjections
Motor Activity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Repeated injections of sulpiride into the medial prefrontal cortex induces sensitization to cocaine in rats. / Steketee, Jeffery; Walsh, Timothy J.

In: Psychopharmacology, Vol. 179, No. 4, 01.06.2005, p. 753-760.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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