Residents' Perceptions of a College Health Clinic to Train Internal Medicine Residents in Adolescent and Primary Care Internal Medicine

Natascha Thompson, James B. Lewis, Elizabeth Aderoju

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To assess internal medicine residency graduates' perception of the value of a college health clinic in providing adolescent medicine and general primary care training to internal medicine residents. Methods: An 11-item questionnaire was sent in mid-2004 to all physicians who had received training at a college health clinic during their internal medicine residency program. Variables examined included time in the clinic and current practice characteristics. In addition, the physicians were asked to compare their residency college clinic with their continuity clinic in the following educational areas: care of the adolescent patient, diagnosis and management of primary care conditions, coding, practice modeling, and overall learning experience. Results: There was a response rate of 71% (30/42). Respondents reported that 31% of their current patients had conditions seen at the college health clinic. The college clinic was felt to be better than the continuity clinic in preparation for the office practice of general internal medicine; the care of the adolescent patient; the diagnosis and management of illnesses such as upper respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and eating disorders; modeling an effective and efficient office practice; and as an overall learning experience. Ninety percent of respondents recommended continuing the use of a college clinic as part of the educational experience for internal medicine residents. Conclusion: Internal medicine residency training programs should consider using college health clinics to provide adolescent medicine training and training for the practice of primary care medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-421
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

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Internal Medicine
Primary Health Care
Internship and Residency
Health
Adolescent Medicine
Patient Care
Learning
Physicians
Urinary Tract Infections
Respiratory Tract Infections
General Practice
Medicine
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Residents' Perceptions of a College Health Clinic to Train Internal Medicine Residents in Adolescent and Primary Care Internal Medicine. / Thompson, Natascha; Lewis, James B.; Aderoju, Elizabeth.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 39, No. 3, 01.09.2006, p. 417-421.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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