Resilience as a moderator between syndemics and depression in mothers living with HIV

Idia Thurston, Kathryn H. Howell, Rebecca C. Kamody, Courtney Maclin-Akinyemi, Jessica Mandell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Physical and emotional adversities in mothers have rippling effects across the family system. While an association between individual maternal adversities and problematic mental health outcomes has been established, less is known about co-existing adversities in mothers. Consistent with the syndemic conceptual framework, we examined the co-occurrence of Substance Abuse, Violence, and AIDS/HIV (i.e., SAVA), which are three adversities that uniquely affect racial/ethnic minorities, individuals living in poverty, and people in urban communities. We assessed the relationship between SAVA adversities and depressive symptoms among mothers living with HIV, as well as the moderating effect of resilience on this relationship. Participants included 55 mothers (Mage= 41.24, SD = 9.01; 81% Black) living with HIV in the U.S. MidSouth. Mothers were recruited from community agencies serving individuals living with HIV and completed hour-long interviews about SAVA, depression, resilience, life stressors, and their child’s mental health. Analyses were conducted in PROCESS for SPSS to test the relationship between SAVA and depression, as moderated by resilience. Analyses controlled for the influence of child maladaptive functioning (given known associations with maternal mental health) and maternal life stressors (given established associations with depressive symptoms). Findings indicated that experiencing more than one SAVA variable was associated with greater depressive symptoms (p <.05). Higher resilience was associated with lower depressive symptoms (r = −.45; p <.01). Moderation was supported (β = −.80; p <.01) as the relationship between more SAVA epidemics and higher depressive symptoms was stronger when resilience was low and weaker when resilience was high. Results not only highlight how co-occurring adversities exacerbate depressive symptoms, but also underscore the role of resilience as a key protective factor among mothers living with HIV. Resilience could therefore be a target of strengths-based treatment to reduce the negative effects of SAVA on depressive symptoms among mothers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1257-1264
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume30
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

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moderator
resilience
Mothers
HIV
Depression
mental health
Mental Health
SPSS
Poverty
substance abuse
national minority
community
Violence
AIDS
Substance-Related Disorders
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
poverty
violence
Interviews
interview

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Resilience as a moderator between syndemics and depression in mothers living with HIV. / Thurston, Idia; Howell, Kathryn H.; Kamody, Rebecca C.; Maclin-Akinyemi, Courtney; Mandell, Jessica.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 30, No. 10, 03.10.2018, p. 1257-1264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thurston, Idia ; Howell, Kathryn H. ; Kamody, Rebecca C. ; Maclin-Akinyemi, Courtney ; Mandell, Jessica. / Resilience as a moderator between syndemics and depression in mothers living with HIV. In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 10. pp. 1257-1264.
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