Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle

Stephen Alway, Robert G. Cutlip

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Resistance loading provides an important tool for understanding skeletal muscle responses and adaptations to various perturbations. A model using anesthetized rodents provides the means to control the input parameters carefully, and to measure the output parameters of each muscle contraction. Unilateral models of anesthetized loading also provide the advantage of comparing an unloaded and loaded muscle from the same animal. Voluntary models for resistance loading arguably provide a more "physiological response" but it also introduces more variability in the input parameters, which can be affected by the stimulus used to motivate the animal to exercise. After either acute or chronic periods of muscle loading, the loaded muscles can be removed and various signaling proteins can be determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) or enzyme assays. Several assays are described, which provide an indication of downstream markers for oxidative stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMyogenesis
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Protocols
EditorsJoseph DiMario
Pages185-211
Number of pages27
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2012
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume798
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Rodentia
Skeletal Muscle
Oxidative Stress
Muscles
Enzyme Assays
Muscle Contraction
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Alway, S., & Cutlip, R. G. (2012). Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle. In J. DiMario (Ed.), Myogenesis: Methods and Protocols (pp. 185-211). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 798). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-343-1_11

Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle. / Alway, Stephen; Cutlip, Robert G.

Myogenesis: Methods and Protocols. ed. / Joseph DiMario. 2012. p. 185-211 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 798).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Alway, S & Cutlip, RG 2012, Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle. in J DiMario (ed.), Myogenesis: Methods and Protocols. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 798, pp. 185-211. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-343-1_11
Alway S, Cutlip RG. Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle. In DiMario J, editor, Myogenesis: Methods and Protocols. 2012. p. 185-211. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-61779-343-1_11
Alway, Stephen ; Cutlip, Robert G. / Resistance loading and signaling assays for oxidative stress in rodent skeletal muscle. Myogenesis: Methods and Protocols. editor / Joseph DiMario. 2012. pp. 185-211 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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