Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Jorge Luján-Zilbermann, Ely Benaim, Xin Tong, Deo K. Srivastava, Christian C. Patrick, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory virus infections (RVI) have become an increasingly appreciated problem in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) population. A retrospective analysis of 274 patients undergoing 281 HSCT at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital from January 1994 through December 1997 was performed. Medical and clinical laboratory records were reviewed beginning at the onset of conditioning through the year following each HSCT, and the analysis was done for the first RVI only. Thirty-two (11%) of 281 HSCT cases developed a RVI during the first year post-HSCT. The most frequent cause of RVI was human parainfluenza virus type 3. Univariate analysis was performed to determine the association between risk factors and the cumulative incidence of RVI. Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of infections in the first year post-HSCT in the pediatric population. Only allogeneic transplant and the degree of acute or chronic graft versus host disease were found to be statistically significant risk factors for RVI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)962-968
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume33
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2001

Fingerprint

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Virus Diseases
Respiratory Tract Infections
Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Pediatrics
Transplants
Human parainfluenza virus 3
Graft vs Host Disease
Population
Viruses
Incidence
Infection
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Luján-Zilbermann, J., Benaim, E., Tong, X., Srivastava, D. K., Patrick, C. C., & Devincenzo, J. (2001). Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 33(7), 962-968. https://doi.org/10.1086/322628

Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. / Luján-Zilbermann, Jorge; Benaim, Ely; Tong, Xin; Srivastava, Deo K.; Patrick, Christian C.; Devincenzo, John.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 33, No. 7, 01.10.2001, p. 962-968.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luján-Zilbermann, J, Benaim, E, Tong, X, Srivastava, DK, Patrick, CC & Devincenzo, J 2001, 'Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 962-968. https://doi.org/10.1086/322628
Luján-Zilbermann, Jorge ; Benaim, Ely ; Tong, Xin ; Srivastava, Deo K. ; Patrick, Christian C. ; Devincenzo, John. / Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 33, No. 7. pp. 962-968.
@article{249c7cda6b0648b6b237ef76f49b3e8b,
title = "Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation",
abstract = "Respiratory virus infections (RVI) have become an increasingly appreciated problem in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) population. A retrospective analysis of 274 patients undergoing 281 HSCT at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital from January 1994 through December 1997 was performed. Medical and clinical laboratory records were reviewed beginning at the onset of conditioning through the year following each HSCT, and the analysis was done for the first RVI only. Thirty-two (11{\%}) of 281 HSCT cases developed a RVI during the first year post-HSCT. The most frequent cause of RVI was human parainfluenza virus type 3. Univariate analysis was performed to determine the association between risk factors and the cumulative incidence of RVI. Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of infections in the first year post-HSCT in the pediatric population. Only allogeneic transplant and the degree of acute or chronic graft versus host disease were found to be statistically significant risk factors for RVI.",
author = "Jorge Luj{\'a}n-Zilbermann and Ely Benaim and Xin Tong and Srivastava, {Deo K.} and Patrick, {Christian C.} and John Devincenzo",
year = "2001",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/322628",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "962--968",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Respiratory virus infections in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

AU - Luján-Zilbermann, Jorge

AU - Benaim, Ely

AU - Tong, Xin

AU - Srivastava, Deo K.

AU - Patrick, Christian C.

AU - Devincenzo, John

PY - 2001/10/1

Y1 - 2001/10/1

N2 - Respiratory virus infections (RVI) have become an increasingly appreciated problem in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) population. A retrospective analysis of 274 patients undergoing 281 HSCT at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital from January 1994 through December 1997 was performed. Medical and clinical laboratory records were reviewed beginning at the onset of conditioning through the year following each HSCT, and the analysis was done for the first RVI only. Thirty-two (11%) of 281 HSCT cases developed a RVI during the first year post-HSCT. The most frequent cause of RVI was human parainfluenza virus type 3. Univariate analysis was performed to determine the association between risk factors and the cumulative incidence of RVI. Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of infections in the first year post-HSCT in the pediatric population. Only allogeneic transplant and the degree of acute or chronic graft versus host disease were found to be statistically significant risk factors for RVI.

AB - Respiratory virus infections (RVI) have become an increasingly appreciated problem in the hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) population. A retrospective analysis of 274 patients undergoing 281 HSCT at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital from January 1994 through December 1997 was performed. Medical and clinical laboratory records were reviewed beginning at the onset of conditioning through the year following each HSCT, and the analysis was done for the first RVI only. Thirty-two (11%) of 281 HSCT cases developed a RVI during the first year post-HSCT. The most frequent cause of RVI was human parainfluenza virus type 3. Univariate analysis was performed to determine the association between risk factors and the cumulative incidence of RVI. Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of infections in the first year post-HSCT in the pediatric population. Only allogeneic transplant and the degree of acute or chronic graft versus host disease were found to be statistically significant risk factors for RVI.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035478883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035478883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/322628

DO - 10.1086/322628

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 962

EP - 968

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 7

ER -