Respiratory viruses augment the adhesion of bacterial pathogens to respiratory epithelium in a viral species- and cell type-dependent manner

Vasanthi Avadhanula, Carina A. Rodriguez, John Devincenzo, Yan Wang, Richard J. Webby, Glen C. Ulett, Elisabeth E. Adderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

192 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Secondary bacterial infections often complicate respiratory viral infections, but the mechanisms whereby viruses predispose to bacterial disease are not completely understood. We determined the effects of infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human parainfluenza virus 3 (HPIV-3), and influenza virus on the abilities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzas and Streptococcus pneumonias to adhere to respiratory epithelial cells and how these viruses alter the expression of known receptors for these bacteria. All viruses enhanced bacterial adhesion to primary and immortalized cell lines. RSV and HPIV-3 infection increased the expression of several known receptors for pathogenic bacteria by primary bronchial epithelial cells and AS49 cells but not by primary small airway epithelial cells. Influenza virus infection did not alter receptor expression. Paramyxoviruses augmented bacterial adherence to primary bronchial epithelial cells and immortalized cell lines by up-regulating eukaryotic cell receptors for these pathogens, whereas this mechanism was less significant in primary small airway epithelial cells and in influenza virus infections. Respiratory viruses promote bacterial adhesion to respiratory epithelial cells, a process that may increase bacterial colonization and contribute to disease. These studies highlight the distinct responses of different cell types to viral infection and the need to consider this variation when interpreting studies of the interactions between respiratory cells and viral pathogens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1629-1636
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

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Bacterial Adhesion
respiratory mucosa
bacterial adhesion
Respiratory Mucosa
epithelial cells
Epithelial Cells
Virus Diseases
Viruses
Human parainfluenza virus 3
viruses
pathogens
Orthomyxoviridae
infection
receptors
cells
cell lines
Haemophilus
Bacteria
Respirovirus
Paramyxoviridae Infections

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Respiratory viruses augment the adhesion of bacterial pathogens to respiratory epithelium in a viral species- and cell type-dependent manner. / Avadhanula, Vasanthi; Rodriguez, Carina A.; Devincenzo, John; Wang, Yan; Webby, Richard J.; Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 80, No. 4, 01.02.2006, p. 1629-1636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Avadhanula, Vasanthi ; Rodriguez, Carina A. ; Devincenzo, John ; Wang, Yan ; Webby, Richard J. ; Ulett, Glen C. ; Adderson, Elisabeth E. / Respiratory viruses augment the adhesion of bacterial pathogens to respiratory epithelium in a viral species- and cell type-dependent manner. In: Journal of Virology. 2006 ; Vol. 80, No. 4. pp. 1629-1636.
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