Responses to intensity-shifted auditory feedback during running speech

Rupal Patel, Kevin Reilly, Erin Archibald, Shanqing Cai, Frank H. Guenther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Responses to intensity perturbation during running speech were measured to understand whether prosodic features are controlled in an independent or integrated manner. Method: Nineteen English-speaking healthy adults (age range = 21–41 years) produced 480 sentences in which emphatic stress was placed on either the 1st or 2nd word. One participant group received an upward intensity perturbation during stressed word production, and the other group received a downward intensity perturbation. Compensations for perturbation were evaluated by comparing differences in participants’ stressed and unstressed peak fundamental frequency (F0), peak intensity, and word duration during perturbed versus baseline trials. Results: Significant increases in stressed–unstressed peak intensities were observed during the ramp and perturbation phases of the experiment in the downward group only. Compensations for F0 and duration did not reach significance for either group. Conclusions: Consistent with previous work, speakers appear sensitive to auditory perturbations that affect a desired linguistic goal. In contrast to previous work on F0 perturbation that supported an integrated-channel model of prosodic control, the current work only found evidence for intensity-specific compensation. This discrepancy may suggest different F0 and intensity control mechanisms, threshold-dependent prosodic modulation, or a combined control scheme.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1687-1694
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Architectural Accessibility
Linguistics
Group
Auditory Feedback
speaking
linguistics
experiment
evidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Responses to intensity-shifted auditory feedback during running speech. / Patel, Rupal; Reilly, Kevin; Archibald, Erin; Cai, Shanqing; Guenther, Frank H.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 1687-1694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Rupal ; Reilly, Kevin ; Archibald, Erin ; Cai, Shanqing ; Guenther, Frank H. / Responses to intensity-shifted auditory feedback during running speech. In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2015 ; Vol. 58, No. 6. pp. 1687-1694.
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