Resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatitis

Roland Dickerson, K. L. Vehe, J. L. Mullen, I. D. Feurer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the resting energy expenditure of hospitalized patients with pancreatitis. Design: Prospective, case-referent study. Setting: Nutrition support service in a university tertiary care hospital. Patients: Patients referred to the Nutrition Support Service with the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Excluded from study entry included those with cancer, obesity (>150% ideal body weight), those measured within 3 postoperative days, or patients requiring ventilator support with an FIO2 of >0.5. Forty-eight patients with either acute pancreatitis (n = 13), chronic pancreatitis (n = 24), acute pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7), or chronic pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7) were studied. The two septic groups were combined into a single pancreatitis-with-sepsis group, since no significant differences among measured variables were observed between individual septic groups. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry and compared with the predicted energy expenditure, as determined by the Harris-Benedict equations. Resting energy expenditure (percent of predicted energy expenditure) was significantly (p < .02) greater for patients with pancreatitis complicated by sepsis (120 ± 11%) compared with the nonseptic chronic pancreatitis group (105 ± 14%). Resting energy expenditure for the nonseptic acute pancreatitis patients (112 ± 17%) was not significantly different from the other groups. The septic pancreatitis group had the largest percentage (82%) of hypermetabolic (resting energy expenditure >110% of predicted energy expenditure) patients, whereas 61% and 33% of the acute and chronic pancreatitis groups were hypermetabolic, respectively (p < .02). Conclusions: Resting energy expenditure is variable in patients with pancreatitis (77% to 139% of predicted energy expenditure). The Harris-Benedict equations are an unreliable estimate of caloric expenditure. Septic complications are associated with hypermetabolism and may be the most important factor influencing resting energy expenditure in pancreatitis patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)484-490
Number of pages7
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

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Pancreatitis
Energy Metabolism
Chronic Pancreatitis
Sepsis
Ideal Body Weight
Indirect Calorimetry
Tertiary Healthcare
Mechanical Ventilators
Health Expenditures
Tertiary Care Centers
Case-Control Studies
Obesity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatitis. / Dickerson, Roland; Vehe, K. L.; Mullen, J. L.; Feurer, I. D.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 484-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dickerson, Roland ; Vehe, K. L. ; Mullen, J. L. ; Feurer, I. D. / Resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatitis. In: Critical Care Medicine. 1991 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 484-490.
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title = "Resting energy expenditure in patients with pancreatitis",
abstract = "Objective: To assess the resting energy expenditure of hospitalized patients with pancreatitis. Design: Prospective, case-referent study. Setting: Nutrition support service in a university tertiary care hospital. Patients: Patients referred to the Nutrition Support Service with the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Excluded from study entry included those with cancer, obesity (>150{\%} ideal body weight), those measured within 3 postoperative days, or patients requiring ventilator support with an FIO2 of >0.5. Forty-eight patients with either acute pancreatitis (n = 13), chronic pancreatitis (n = 24), acute pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7), or chronic pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7) were studied. The two septic groups were combined into a single pancreatitis-with-sepsis group, since no significant differences among measured variables were observed between individual septic groups. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry and compared with the predicted energy expenditure, as determined by the Harris-Benedict equations. Resting energy expenditure (percent of predicted energy expenditure) was significantly (p < .02) greater for patients with pancreatitis complicated by sepsis (120 ± 11{\%}) compared with the nonseptic chronic pancreatitis group (105 ± 14{\%}). Resting energy expenditure for the nonseptic acute pancreatitis patients (112 ± 17{\%}) was not significantly different from the other groups. The septic pancreatitis group had the largest percentage (82{\%}) of hypermetabolic (resting energy expenditure >110{\%} of predicted energy expenditure) patients, whereas 61{\%} and 33{\%} of the acute and chronic pancreatitis groups were hypermetabolic, respectively (p < .02). Conclusions: Resting energy expenditure is variable in patients with pancreatitis (77{\%} to 139{\%} of predicted energy expenditure). The Harris-Benedict equations are an unreliable estimate of caloric expenditure. Septic complications are associated with hypermetabolism and may be the most important factor influencing resting energy expenditure in pancreatitis patients.",
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N2 - Objective: To assess the resting energy expenditure of hospitalized patients with pancreatitis. Design: Prospective, case-referent study. Setting: Nutrition support service in a university tertiary care hospital. Patients: Patients referred to the Nutrition Support Service with the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Excluded from study entry included those with cancer, obesity (>150% ideal body weight), those measured within 3 postoperative days, or patients requiring ventilator support with an FIO2 of >0.5. Forty-eight patients with either acute pancreatitis (n = 13), chronic pancreatitis (n = 24), acute pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7), or chronic pancreatitis with sepsis (n = 7) were studied. The two septic groups were combined into a single pancreatitis-with-sepsis group, since no significant differences among measured variables were observed between individual septic groups. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry and compared with the predicted energy expenditure, as determined by the Harris-Benedict equations. Resting energy expenditure (percent of predicted energy expenditure) was significantly (p < .02) greater for patients with pancreatitis complicated by sepsis (120 ± 11%) compared with the nonseptic chronic pancreatitis group (105 ± 14%). Resting energy expenditure for the nonseptic acute pancreatitis patients (112 ± 17%) was not significantly different from the other groups. The septic pancreatitis group had the largest percentage (82%) of hypermetabolic (resting energy expenditure >110% of predicted energy expenditure) patients, whereas 61% and 33% of the acute and chronic pancreatitis groups were hypermetabolic, respectively (p < .02). Conclusions: Resting energy expenditure is variable in patients with pancreatitis (77% to 139% of predicted energy expenditure). The Harris-Benedict equations are an unreliable estimate of caloric expenditure. Septic complications are associated with hypermetabolism and may be the most important factor influencing resting energy expenditure in pancreatitis patients.

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