Results of laser tissue soldering in vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy

Experience in the rat animal model

Eric K. Seaman, Edward Kim, Andrew J. Kirsch, Yu Chuan Pan, Steve Lewitton, Larry I. Lipshultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of microsurgical techniques (vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy) for vasectomy reversal has now enabled surgeons to perform both procedures with certainly acceptable success rates. However, these operations are technically demanding and require special training in microsurgery. Purpose: A new method of performing these procedures using laser tissue soldering is described and results are evaluated. Laser tissue soldering is different from laser welding in that it involves the laser activation of a protein solder with a dye specific for the specific wavelength of laser light; therefore, surrounding tissue is not affected by the laser. Materials and Methods: Ten rats underwent bilateral vasovasostomy and eleven underwent bilateral epididymovasostomy. In each rat, a sutured anastomosis was performed on one side while laser tissue soldering was performed on the other. Animals were sacrificed after one month and anastomoses were evaluated for patency and presence of sperm granulomas. Histologic analysis was also performed. Results: Patency rates were 8/10 (80%) for sutured vasovasostomy versus 9/10 (90%) for the laser technique. Epididymovasostomy patency rates were 8/11 (73%) for sutured versus 9/11 (82%) for the laser technique. Mean operative times were significantly shorter for lasered anastomoses when compared to controls. The frequency of granuloma formation did not significantly differ between laser and control groups. Conclusions: Laser tissue soldering resulted in similar patency when compared to a conventional 2 layered sutured anastomosis while decreasing operative time. In addition, since fewer sutures are placed, the laser method is less technically demanding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-645
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume158
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vasovasostomy
Lasers
Animal Models
Operative Time
Granuloma
Welding
Microsurgery
Sutures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Results of laser tissue soldering in vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy : Experience in the rat animal model. / Seaman, Eric K.; Kim, Edward; Kirsch, Andrew J.; Pan, Yu Chuan; Lewitton, Steve; Lipshultz, Larry I.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 158, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 642-645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seaman, Eric K. ; Kim, Edward ; Kirsch, Andrew J. ; Pan, Yu Chuan ; Lewitton, Steve ; Lipshultz, Larry I. / Results of laser tissue soldering in vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy : Experience in the rat animal model. In: Journal of Urology. 1997 ; Vol. 158, No. 2. pp. 642-645.
@article{3b5a98dde3dc4702b85e44e1825770bb,
title = "Results of laser tissue soldering in vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy: Experience in the rat animal model",
abstract = "The use of microsurgical techniques (vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy) for vasectomy reversal has now enabled surgeons to perform both procedures with certainly acceptable success rates. However, these operations are technically demanding and require special training in microsurgery. Purpose: A new method of performing these procedures using laser tissue soldering is described and results are evaluated. Laser tissue soldering is different from laser welding in that it involves the laser activation of a protein solder with a dye specific for the specific wavelength of laser light; therefore, surrounding tissue is not affected by the laser. Materials and Methods: Ten rats underwent bilateral vasovasostomy and eleven underwent bilateral epididymovasostomy. In each rat, a sutured anastomosis was performed on one side while laser tissue soldering was performed on the other. Animals were sacrificed after one month and anastomoses were evaluated for patency and presence of sperm granulomas. Histologic analysis was also performed. Results: Patency rates were 8/10 (80{\%}) for sutured vasovasostomy versus 9/10 (90{\%}) for the laser technique. Epididymovasostomy patency rates were 8/11 (73{\%}) for sutured versus 9/11 (82{\%}) for the laser technique. Mean operative times were significantly shorter for lasered anastomoses when compared to controls. The frequency of granuloma formation did not significantly differ between laser and control groups. Conclusions: Laser tissue soldering resulted in similar patency when compared to a conventional 2 layered sutured anastomosis while decreasing operative time. In addition, since fewer sutures are placed, the laser method is less technically demanding.",
author = "Seaman, {Eric K.} and Edward Kim and Kirsch, {Andrew J.} and Pan, {Yu Chuan} and Steve Lewitton and Lipshultz, {Larry I.}",
year = "1997",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-5347(01)64575-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "158",
pages = "642--645",
journal = "Journal of Urology",
issn = "0022-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Results of laser tissue soldering in vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy

T2 - Experience in the rat animal model

AU - Seaman, Eric K.

AU - Kim, Edward

AU - Kirsch, Andrew J.

AU - Pan, Yu Chuan

AU - Lewitton, Steve

AU - Lipshultz, Larry I.

PY - 1997/1/1

Y1 - 1997/1/1

N2 - The use of microsurgical techniques (vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy) for vasectomy reversal has now enabled surgeons to perform both procedures with certainly acceptable success rates. However, these operations are technically demanding and require special training in microsurgery. Purpose: A new method of performing these procedures using laser tissue soldering is described and results are evaluated. Laser tissue soldering is different from laser welding in that it involves the laser activation of a protein solder with a dye specific for the specific wavelength of laser light; therefore, surrounding tissue is not affected by the laser. Materials and Methods: Ten rats underwent bilateral vasovasostomy and eleven underwent bilateral epididymovasostomy. In each rat, a sutured anastomosis was performed on one side while laser tissue soldering was performed on the other. Animals were sacrificed after one month and anastomoses were evaluated for patency and presence of sperm granulomas. Histologic analysis was also performed. Results: Patency rates were 8/10 (80%) for sutured vasovasostomy versus 9/10 (90%) for the laser technique. Epididymovasostomy patency rates were 8/11 (73%) for sutured versus 9/11 (82%) for the laser technique. Mean operative times were significantly shorter for lasered anastomoses when compared to controls. The frequency of granuloma formation did not significantly differ between laser and control groups. Conclusions: Laser tissue soldering resulted in similar patency when compared to a conventional 2 layered sutured anastomosis while decreasing operative time. In addition, since fewer sutures are placed, the laser method is less technically demanding.

AB - The use of microsurgical techniques (vasovasostomy and epididymovasostomy) for vasectomy reversal has now enabled surgeons to perform both procedures with certainly acceptable success rates. However, these operations are technically demanding and require special training in microsurgery. Purpose: A new method of performing these procedures using laser tissue soldering is described and results are evaluated. Laser tissue soldering is different from laser welding in that it involves the laser activation of a protein solder with a dye specific for the specific wavelength of laser light; therefore, surrounding tissue is not affected by the laser. Materials and Methods: Ten rats underwent bilateral vasovasostomy and eleven underwent bilateral epididymovasostomy. In each rat, a sutured anastomosis was performed on one side while laser tissue soldering was performed on the other. Animals were sacrificed after one month and anastomoses were evaluated for patency and presence of sperm granulomas. Histologic analysis was also performed. Results: Patency rates were 8/10 (80%) for sutured vasovasostomy versus 9/10 (90%) for the laser technique. Epididymovasostomy patency rates were 8/11 (73%) for sutured versus 9/11 (82%) for the laser technique. Mean operative times were significantly shorter for lasered anastomoses when compared to controls. The frequency of granuloma formation did not significantly differ between laser and control groups. Conclusions: Laser tissue soldering resulted in similar patency when compared to a conventional 2 layered sutured anastomosis while decreasing operative time. In addition, since fewer sutures are placed, the laser method is less technically demanding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030852918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030852918&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)64575-0

DO - 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)64575-0

M3 - Article

VL - 158

SP - 642

EP - 645

JO - Journal of Urology

JF - Journal of Urology

SN - 0022-5347

IS - 2

ER -