Results of the Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy (PERK) Study 4 Years After Surgery for Myopia

PERK Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy Study is a nine-center clinical trial of a surgical technique to reduce simple myopia by making incisions in the cornea. There were 435 patients (one eye per patient is reported) enrolled in the study with a 91% follow-up rate at 4 years after surgery. After surgery, uncorrected visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 76% of eyes. Fifty-five percent of the eyes had a refractive error within ± 1.00 diopter; 28% were undercorrected, and 17% were overcorrected by more than 1.00 D. The width of the prediction 90% interval for the refractive change was 4.42 D, indicating a lack of predictability. The refractive error was not stable in some eyes; between 6 months and 4 years after surgery, 23% of eyes had a continued effect of the surgery of more than 1.00 D. For 323 patients with both eyes operated on, 64% stated they wore no optical correction. There were few serious complications. Eleven eyes (3%) lost two or three lines of best corrected visual acuity. Two eyes developed delayed bacterial keratitis without significant loss in best corrected visual acuity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1083-1091
Number of pages9
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume263
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 23 1990

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Radial Keratotomy
Myopia
Visual Acuity
Refractive Errors
Keratitis
Cornea
Clinical Trials

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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Results of the Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy (PERK) Study 4 Years After Surgery for Myopia. / PERK Study Group.

In: JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 263, No. 8, 23.02.1990, p. 1083-1091.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "The Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy Study is a nine-center clinical trial of a surgical technique to reduce simple myopia by making incisions in the cornea. There were 435 patients (one eye per patient is reported) enrolled in the study with a 91{\%} follow-up rate at 4 years after surgery. After surgery, uncorrected visual acuity was 20/40 or better in 76{\%} of eyes. Fifty-five percent of the eyes had a refractive error within ± 1.00 diopter; 28{\%} were undercorrected, and 17{\%} were overcorrected by more than 1.00 D. The width of the prediction 90{\%} interval for the refractive change was 4.42 D, indicating a lack of predictability. The refractive error was not stable in some eyes; between 6 months and 4 years after surgery, 23{\%} of eyes had a continued effect of the surgery of more than 1.00 D. For 323 patients with both eyes operated on, 64{\%} stated they wore no optical correction. There were few serious complications. Eleven eyes (3{\%}) lost two or three lines of best corrected visual acuity. Two eyes developed delayed bacterial keratitis without significant loss in best corrected visual acuity.",
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