Retinol-binding protein and prealbumin: Useful measures of protein repletion in critically Ill, malnourished infants

Richard Helms, Roland Dickerson, Mary Lou Ebbert, Michael Christensen, Henry G. Herrod

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21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plasma prealbumin (PA) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) concentrations were serially measured in 25 critically ill, malnourished infants requiring parenteral nutrition to determine if these visceral protein markers are useful in assessing acute protein repletion. Significant increases in both proteins (p < 0.05) were noted as early as 5 to 7 days after institution of parenteral nutrition and continued significantly above baseline values through 2 weeks of observation. Gestational development (in infants less than 4 weeks old) and mean protein intake influenced visceral protein responses. Appropriate for gestational age neonates had more rapid and quantitatively greater PA responses (p < 0.05) than small for gestational age neonates. Small for gestational age neonates never exceeded baseline RBP responses. Average protein intake of ≤2 g/kg/day resulted in PA and RBP concentrations below baseline and significantly lower than infants on higher protein intakes (p < 0.05), at the end of 2 weeks. Average calorie intake of >100 cal/kg/day had no differential influence on PA or RBP when compared with infants on less calories. Prealbumin values correlated with RBP values observed simultaneously (r = 0.588, p < 0.0001). We conclude that PA and RBP are useful measures of protein repletion in critically ill infants requiring parenteral nutrition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)586-592
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Retinol-Binding Proteins
Prealbumin
Critical Illness
Parenteral Nutrition
Plasma Retinol-Binding Proteins
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Retinol-binding protein and prealbumin: Useful measures of protein repletion in critically Ill, malnourished infants",
abstract = "Plasma prealbumin (PA) and retinol-binding protein (RBP) concentrations were serially measured in 25 critically ill, malnourished infants requiring parenteral nutrition to determine if these visceral protein markers are useful in assessing acute protein repletion. Significant increases in both proteins (p < 0.05) were noted as early as 5 to 7 days after institution of parenteral nutrition and continued significantly above baseline values through 2 weeks of observation. Gestational development (in infants less than 4 weeks old) and mean protein intake influenced visceral protein responses. Appropriate for gestational age neonates had more rapid and quantitatively greater PA responses (p < 0.05) than small for gestational age neonates. Small for gestational age neonates never exceeded baseline RBP responses. Average protein intake of ≤2 g/kg/day resulted in PA and RBP concentrations below baseline and significantly lower than infants on higher protein intakes (p < 0.05), at the end of 2 weeks. Average calorie intake of >100 cal/kg/day had no differential influence on PA or RBP when compared with infants on less calories. Prealbumin values correlated with RBP values observed simultaneously (r = 0.588, p < 0.0001). We conclude that PA and RBP are useful measures of protein repletion in critically ill infants requiring parenteral nutrition.",
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