Retrospective study of the effect of disease progression on patient reported outcomes in HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients

Mark S. Walker, Murad Hasan, Yeun Mi Yim, Elaine Yu, Edward J. Stepanski, Lee Schwartzberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This retrospective study evaluated the impact of disease progression and of specific sites of metastasis on patient reported outcomes (PROs) that assess symptom burden and health related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with metastatic breast cancer (mBC).Methods: HER-2 negative mBC patients (n = 102) were enrolled from 7 U.S. community oncology practices. Demographic, disease and treatment characteristics were abstracted from electronic medical records and linked to archived Patient Care Monitor (PCM) assessments. The PCM is a self-report measure of symptom burden and HRQoL administered as part of routine care in participating practices. Linear mixed models were used to examine change in PCM scores over time.Results: Mean age was 57 years, with 72% of patients Caucasian, and 25% African American. Median time from mBC diagnosis to first disease progression was 8.8 months. Metastasis to bone (60%), lung (28%) and liver (26%) predominated at initial metastatic diagnosis. Results showed that PCM items assessing fatigue, physical pain and trouble sleeping were sensitive to either general effects of disease progression or to effects associated with specific sites of metastasis. Progression of disease was also associated with modest but significant worsening of General Physical Symptoms, Treatment Side Effects, Acute Distress and Impaired Performance index scores. In addition, there were marked detrimental effects of liver metastasis on Treatment Side Effects, and of brain metastasis on Acute Distress.Conclusions: Disease progression has a detrimental impact on cancer-related symptoms. Delaying disease progression may have a positive impact on patients' HRQoL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number46
JournalHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 20 2011

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Disease Progression
Retrospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Patient Care
Quality of Life
Electronic Health Records
Liver
African Americans
Self Report
Fatigue
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Linear Models
Therapeutics
Demography
Bone and Bones
Pain
Lung
Brain
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Retrospective study of the effect of disease progression on patient reported outcomes in HER-2 negative metastatic breast cancer patients. / Walker, Mark S.; Hasan, Murad; Mi Yim, Yeun; Yu, Elaine; Stepanski, Edward J.; Schwartzberg, Lee.

In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, Vol. 9, 46, 20.06.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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