Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients

Maxwell M. Mozell, David N. Schwartz, Steven Youngentob, Donald A. Leopold, David E. Hornung, Paul R. Sheehe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assess the degree to which the olfactory deficit associated with laryngectomy is simply due to the loss of nasal airflow, 17 laryngectomees were fitted with a device (larynx bypass) which allowed them to produce approximately normal sniffs. Detection thresholds were determined for two odorants, vanillin (reportedly excites only the olfactory nerve) and ammonia (a strong trigeminal irritant). Without the bypass nine patients detected neither odorant. The others, who could manoeuver somewhat more vigorous nasal airflows, detected the odorants but only half had 'normal' thresholds. In this latter group there was a tendency for decreasing detection thresholds with increasing postoperative years. With the bypass all 17 patients achieved 'normal' ammonia thresholds whereas 10 achieved 'normal' vanillin thresholds. Thus, the loss of nasal airflow is a major contributor to the olfactory deficit of laryngectomy, and it may be the only contributor for trigeminal irritants like ammonia. On the other hand, for non-trigeminal stimuli like vanillin other factors seem to be involved.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-410
Number of pages14
JournalChemical Senses
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nose
Ammonia
Laryngectomy
Irritants
Olfactory Nerve
Larynx
Equipment and Supplies
vanillin
Odorants

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Mozell, M. M., Schwartz, D. N., Youngentob, S., Leopold, D. A., Hornung, D. E., & Sheehe, P. R. (1986). Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients. Chemical Senses, 11(3), 397-410. https://doi.org/10.1093/chemse/11.3.397

Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients. / Mozell, Maxwell M.; Schwartz, David N.; Youngentob, Steven; Leopold, Donald A.; Hornung, David E.; Sheehe, Paul R.

In: Chemical Senses, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.08.1986, p. 397-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mozell, MM, Schwartz, DN, Youngentob, S, Leopold, DA, Hornung, DE & Sheehe, PR 1986, 'Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients', Chemical Senses, vol. 11, no. 3, pp. 397-410. https://doi.org/10.1093/chemse/11.3.397
Mozell MM, Schwartz DN, Youngentob S, Leopold DA, Hornung DE, Sheehe PR. Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients. Chemical Senses. 1986 Aug 1;11(3):397-410. https://doi.org/10.1093/chemse/11.3.397
Mozell, Maxwell M. ; Schwartz, David N. ; Youngentob, Steven ; Leopold, Donald A. ; Hornung, David E. ; Sheehe, Paul R. / Reversal of hyposmia in laryngectomized patients. In: Chemical Senses. 1986 ; Vol. 11, No. 3. pp. 397-410.
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