Reversal of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and dependence by the acute supraspinal inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

Lei Tang, Pradeep Kumar Shukla, Lili X. Wang, Jim Wang Zaijie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can modulate opioid tolerance and dependence via its action on learning and memory. In this study, we examined whether CaMKII could directly regulate opioid tolerance and dependence. CaMKII activity was increased after the treatment with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c. or 75 mg s.c. of morphine/pellet/mouse); the effect exhibited a temporal correction with the development of opioid tolerance and dependence. In mice treated with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.), morphine tolerance and dependence developed in 2 to 6 h. An acute supraspinal administration of KN93 [2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)- N-methylbenzylamine)], a CaMKII inhibitor, was able to dose-dependently reverse the already-established antinociceptive tolerance to morphine (p < 0.001 for 15-30 nmol; not significant for 5 nmol). KN92 [2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine] (30 nmol i.c.v.), a kinase-inactive analog of KN93, did not affect opioid tolerance. Neither KN92 nor KN93 affected basal nociception or acute morphine antinociception (1-10 nmol i.c.v.). Likewise, dependence on morphine was abolished by the acute administration of KN93, but not KN92, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of mice with KN93 also prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence. The effect of acute CaMKII inhibition was not limited to the particular experimental model, because KN93 also acutely reversed the established opioid tolerance and dependence in mice treated with morphine (75 mg/pellet/mouse s.c.) for 6 days. Taken together, these data strongly support the hypothesis that CaMKII can act as a key and direct factor in promoting opioid tolerance and dependence. Identifying such a direct mechanism may be useful for designing pharmacological treatments for these conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)901-909
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
Volume317
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Morphine
Opioid Analgesics
Morphine Dependence
Nociception
Protein Kinase Inhibitors
Inhibition (Psychology)
Theoretical Models
Phosphotransferases
Learning
Pharmacology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Pharmacology

Cite this

@article{ae09a02122944ebb8508704647653152,
title = "Reversal of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and dependence by the acute supraspinal inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II",
abstract = "Previous studies have suggested that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can modulate opioid tolerance and dependence via its action on learning and memory. In this study, we examined whether CaMKII could directly regulate opioid tolerance and dependence. CaMKII activity was increased after the treatment with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c. or 75 mg s.c. of morphine/pellet/mouse); the effect exhibited a temporal correction with the development of opioid tolerance and dependence. In mice treated with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.), morphine tolerance and dependence developed in 2 to 6 h. An acute supraspinal administration of KN93 [2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)- N-methylbenzylamine)], a CaMKII inhibitor, was able to dose-dependently reverse the already-established antinociceptive tolerance to morphine (p < 0.001 for 15-30 nmol; not significant for 5 nmol). KN92 [2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine] (30 nmol i.c.v.), a kinase-inactive analog of KN93, did not affect opioid tolerance. Neither KN92 nor KN93 affected basal nociception or acute morphine antinociception (1-10 nmol i.c.v.). Likewise, dependence on morphine was abolished by the acute administration of KN93, but not KN92, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of mice with KN93 also prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence. The effect of acute CaMKII inhibition was not limited to the particular experimental model, because KN93 also acutely reversed the established opioid tolerance and dependence in mice treated with morphine (75 mg/pellet/mouse s.c.) for 6 days. Taken together, these data strongly support the hypothesis that CaMKII can act as a key and direct factor in promoting opioid tolerance and dependence. Identifying such a direct mechanism may be useful for designing pharmacological treatments for these conditions.",
author = "Lei Tang and Shukla, {Pradeep Kumar} and Wang, {Lili X.} and Zaijie, {Jim Wang}",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1124/jpet.105.097733",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "317",
pages = "901--909",
journal = "Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics",
issn = "0022-3565",
publisher = "American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reversal of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and dependence by the acute supraspinal inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II

AU - Tang, Lei

AU - Shukla, Pradeep Kumar

AU - Wang, Lili X.

AU - Zaijie, Jim Wang

PY - 2006/5/1

Y1 - 2006/5/1

N2 - Previous studies have suggested that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can modulate opioid tolerance and dependence via its action on learning and memory. In this study, we examined whether CaMKII could directly regulate opioid tolerance and dependence. CaMKII activity was increased after the treatment with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c. or 75 mg s.c. of morphine/pellet/mouse); the effect exhibited a temporal correction with the development of opioid tolerance and dependence. In mice treated with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.), morphine tolerance and dependence developed in 2 to 6 h. An acute supraspinal administration of KN93 [2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)- N-methylbenzylamine)], a CaMKII inhibitor, was able to dose-dependently reverse the already-established antinociceptive tolerance to morphine (p < 0.001 for 15-30 nmol; not significant for 5 nmol). KN92 [2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine] (30 nmol i.c.v.), a kinase-inactive analog of KN93, did not affect opioid tolerance. Neither KN92 nor KN93 affected basal nociception or acute morphine antinociception (1-10 nmol i.c.v.). Likewise, dependence on morphine was abolished by the acute administration of KN93, but not KN92, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of mice with KN93 also prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence. The effect of acute CaMKII inhibition was not limited to the particular experimental model, because KN93 also acutely reversed the established opioid tolerance and dependence in mice treated with morphine (75 mg/pellet/mouse s.c.) for 6 days. Taken together, these data strongly support the hypothesis that CaMKII can act as a key and direct factor in promoting opioid tolerance and dependence. Identifying such a direct mechanism may be useful for designing pharmacological treatments for these conditions.

AB - Previous studies have suggested that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can modulate opioid tolerance and dependence via its action on learning and memory. In this study, we examined whether CaMKII could directly regulate opioid tolerance and dependence. CaMKII activity was increased after the treatment with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c. or 75 mg s.c. of morphine/pellet/mouse); the effect exhibited a temporal correction with the development of opioid tolerance and dependence. In mice treated with morphine (100 mg/kg s.c.), morphine tolerance and dependence developed in 2 to 6 h. An acute supraspinal administration of KN93 [2-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl)]-N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)- N-methylbenzylamine)], a CaMKII inhibitor, was able to dose-dependently reverse the already-established antinociceptive tolerance to morphine (p < 0.001 for 15-30 nmol; not significant for 5 nmol). KN92 [2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine] (30 nmol i.c.v.), a kinase-inactive analog of KN93, did not affect opioid tolerance. Neither KN92 nor KN93 affected basal nociception or acute morphine antinociception (1-10 nmol i.c.v.). Likewise, dependence on morphine was abolished by the acute administration of KN93, but not KN92, in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of mice with KN93 also prevented the development of morphine tolerance and dependence. The effect of acute CaMKII inhibition was not limited to the particular experimental model, because KN93 also acutely reversed the established opioid tolerance and dependence in mice treated with morphine (75 mg/pellet/mouse s.c.) for 6 days. Taken together, these data strongly support the hypothesis that CaMKII can act as a key and direct factor in promoting opioid tolerance and dependence. Identifying such a direct mechanism may be useful for designing pharmacological treatments for these conditions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645890866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645890866&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1124/jpet.105.097733

DO - 10.1124/jpet.105.097733

M3 - Article

VL - 317

SP - 901

EP - 909

JO - Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

JF - Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

SN - 0022-3565

IS - 2

ER -