Reversing the deleterious effects of α2-antiplasmin on tissue plasminogen activator therapy improves outcomes in experimental ischemic stroke

Aiilyan K. Houng, Dong Wang, Guy Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

High blood levels of α2-antiplasmin have been associated with failed tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) therapy for ischemic stroke. Yet, other data suggests that α2-antiplasmin may be protective in stroke, because it defends against bleeding and excitotoxicity. To address this paradox, we examined the effects of high α2-antiplasmin levels and α2-antiplasmin inactivation in mice treated with TPA 0.5-2.5. h after middle cerebral artery (MCA) thromboembolism. Brain infarction, swelling, hemorrhage, blood brain barrier breakdown and neuronal apoptosis were measured by a blinded observer. Thrombus dissolution was determined by gamma counting. During TPA treatment, high α2-antiplasmin blood levels increased brain infarction (2.2-fold) and swelling (3.7-fold), but decreased MCA thrombus dissolution. Conversely, α2-antiplasmin inactivation during TPA treatment reduced brain infarction, hemorrhage and swelling, but increased MCA thrombus dissolution. Inactivation of α2-antiplasmin during TPA treatment reduced neuronal apoptosis and blood brain barrier breakdown. Inactivation of α2-antiplasmin also reduced short-term mortality. Taken together these data show that α2-antiplasmin opposes the effects of TPA therapy and contributes to enhanced brain injury after experimental thromboembolic stroke. Conversely, α2-antiplasmin inactivation during TPA treatment improves thrombus dissolution and reduces brain infarction, swelling and hemorrhage. Consistent with clinical observations, these data suggest that α2-antiplasmin exerts deleterious effects that reduce the efficacy and safety of TPA therapy for ischemic stroke.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalExperimental Neurology
Volume255
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Antifibrinolytic Agents
Tissue Plasminogen Activator
Stroke
Brain Infarction
Brain Edema
Middle Cerebral Artery
Therapeutics
Intracranial Thrombosis
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Blood-Brain Barrier
Thrombosis
Apoptosis
Hemorrhage
Thromboembolism
Brain Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

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Reversing the deleterious effects of α2-antiplasmin on tissue plasminogen activator therapy improves outcomes in experimental ischemic stroke. / Houng, Aiilyan K.; Wang, Dong; Reed, Guy.

In: Experimental Neurology, Vol. 255, 01.01.2014, p. 56-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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