Review article

Oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

J. Pisegna, G. Holtmann, Colin Howden, P. H. Katelaris, P. Sharma, S. Spechler, G. Triadafilopoulos, G. Tytgat

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The major oesophageal complications associated with persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include erosive oesophagitis, ulceration, strictures and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Although the causes of these complications are uncertain, studies indicate that erosive oesophagitis may progress to the development of ulcers, strictures and GI bleeding. Pharmacological treatment with proton pump inhibitors is favoured over that with H2-receptor antagonists for the treatment of strictures. The treatment of strictures is accomplished with dilation and many favour the concomitant use of proton pump inhibitors. Most gastroenterologists are seeing far fewer oesophageal strictures these days since the introduction of proton pump inhibitors. In addition, research has shown that oesophageal complications have a greater impact on patients suffering from night-time GERD than on those suffering from daytime GERD. Barrett's oesophagus is a significant complication associated with persistent GERD and those at risk generally experience a longer duration of symptoms, especially those with a high degree of severity. In addition, there is a strong relationship between Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. This is in part due to the association of obesity and the development of hiatal hernias. Furthermore, endoscopic screening is being used to detect Barrett's oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma in persons suffering from chronic GERD, even though screening may not have an impact on outcomes (Sharma P, McQuaid K, Dent J, et al. A critical review of the diagnosis and management of Barrett's esophagus: The AGA Chicago Workshop. Gastroenterology 2004; 127: 310-30.).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-56
Number of pages10
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement
Volume20
Issue number9
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Fingerprint

Esophageal Diseases
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Barrett Esophagus
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Pathologic Constriction
Esophagitis
Adenocarcinoma
Hemorrhage
Esophageal Stenosis
Histamine H2 Receptors
Hiatal Hernia
Gastroenterology
Ulcer
Dilatation
Therapeutics
Obesity
Pharmacology
Education
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Review article : Oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. / Pisegna, J.; Holtmann, G.; Howden, Colin; Katelaris, P. H.; Sharma, P.; Spechler, S.; Triadafilopoulos, G.; Tytgat, G.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement, Vol. 20, No. 9, 01.12.2004, p. 47-56.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Pisegna, J, Holtmann, G, Howden, C, Katelaris, PH, Sharma, P, Spechler, S, Triadafilopoulos, G & Tytgat, G 2004, 'Review article: Oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease', Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement, vol. 20, no. 9, pp. 47-56.
Pisegna, J. ; Holtmann, G. ; Howden, Colin ; Katelaris, P. H. ; Sharma, P. ; Spechler, S. ; Triadafilopoulos, G. ; Tytgat, G. / Review article : Oesophageal complications and consequences of persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement. 2004 ; Vol. 20, No. 9. pp. 47-56.
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