Review article: Similarities and differences among delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor formulations

J. R. Horn, Colin Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Proton-pump inhibitors are acid-labile, and require an enteric coating to protect them from degradation in the stomach when given orally. However, this leads to delayed absorption and onset of action of the proton-pump inhibitor. This article aims to review the similarities and differences between the various formulations of delayed release proton-pump inhibitors. Delayed-release omeprazole and delayed-release lansoprazole have been suspended in sodium bicarbonate for tube administration; however, for omeprazole, absorption is further impaired and antisecretory effects are disappointing. Although such formulations may be more convenient for clinical use in certain patient groups, absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor is still influenced by residual enteric coating. There are few differences among the currently available delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors with respect to their pharmacodynamic effects during chronic administration. There are minor formulation-based pharmacokinetic differences among these agents, primarily reflected in their bioavailability following the first few doses. Differences in bioavailability may explain slight differences in the rate of onset of maximal antisecretory effect. However, minor pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences are not associated with meaningful differences in clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-24
Number of pages5
JournalAlimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement
Volume22
Issue number3
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proton Pump Inhibitors
Omeprazole
Biological Availability
Pharmacokinetics
Lansoprazole
Sodium Bicarbonate
Stomach
Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Review article : Similarities and differences among delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor formulations. / Horn, J. R.; Howden, Colin.

In: Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Supplement, Vol. 22, No. 3, 12.2005, p. 20-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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