Rhabdovirus glycoproteins

Yves Gaudin, Michael Whitt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Rhabdoviruses are unique among enveloped animal viruses in that they encode a single, uncleaved glycoprotein (G) that functions for both receptor binding and membrane fusion during virus entry. G also contributes to efficient virus assembly and release by budding of nascent virions from the plasma membrane. The G proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies virus (RABV) are the best studied and VSV G has been used as a model membrane protein for studying the host cell machinery responsible for transport through the secretory pathway, which is due in part to the rapid transport kinetics of G from the endoplasmic reticulum through the Golgi and to the cell surface. It is assumed that the G proteins of other viruses from the Rhabdoviridae family have properties similar to VSV and RABV G. Indeed, sequence alignments of the G proteins from VSV, RABV, bovine ephemeral fever virus (BEFV) and infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) demonstrate that the locations of neutralizing epitopes and cysteine residues in the ectodomains of these proteins are similar, which supports the idea that the basic elements of the folded structure of rhabdovirus G proteins are preserved. Despite intensive interest in understanding the mechanism of rhabdovirus G-induced membrane fusion and the conformational changes induced during the membrane fusion reaction, only recently has the structure of one of these (VSV G) in the pre- and post-fusion conformations been determined. Because of the medical significance of RABV, and the extensive body of literature on the structure and function of VSV G, this chapter will primarily focus on these two representative members of the Rhabdoviridae family, although where appropriate, information on other rhabdovirus G proteins will also be presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBiology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses
PublisherWorld Scientific Publishing Co.
Pages49-73
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9789814635349
ISBN (Print)9789814635332
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Rhabdoviridae
Rabies virus
Glycoproteins
Vesicular Stomatitis
Viruses
Membrane Fusion
GTP-Binding Proteins
Bovine ephemeral fever virus
Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus
Virus Release
Virus Assembly
Virus Internalization
Sequence Alignment
Secretory Pathway
Endoplasmic Reticulum
Virion
Cysteine
Epitopes
Membrane Proteins
Cell Membrane

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gaudin, Y., & Whitt, M. (2014). Rhabdovirus glycoproteins. In Biology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses (pp. 49-73). World Scientific Publishing Co.. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814635349_0004

Rhabdovirus glycoproteins. / Gaudin, Yves; Whitt, Michael.

Biology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses. World Scientific Publishing Co., 2014. p. 49-73.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Gaudin, Y & Whitt, M 2014, Rhabdovirus glycoproteins. in Biology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses. World Scientific Publishing Co., pp. 49-73. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814635349_0004
Gaudin Y, Whitt M. Rhabdovirus glycoproteins. In Biology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses. World Scientific Publishing Co. 2014. p. 49-73 https://doi.org/10.1142/9789814635349_0004
Gaudin, Yves ; Whitt, Michael. / Rhabdovirus glycoproteins. Biology and Pathogenesis of Rhabdo- and Filoviruses. World Scientific Publishing Co., 2014. pp. 49-73
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