Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia

Xiaoyan Lu, Eileen Schneider, Seema Jain, Anna M. Bramley, Weston Hymas, Chris Stockmann, Krow Ampofo, Sandra Arnold, Derek J. Williams, Wesley H. Self, Anami Patel, James D. Chappell, Carlos G. Grijalva, Evan J. Anderson, Richard G. Wunderink, Jonathan Mccullers, Kathryn M. Edwards, Andrew T. Pavia, Dean D. Erdman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods. Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Results. Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged < 10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. Conclusions. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1104-1111
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume216
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Rhinovirus
Viremia
Pneumonia
Asymptomatic Infections
Hospitalized Child
Respiratory Sounds
Respiratory Tract Infections
Respiratory System
Reverse Transcription

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lu, X., Schneider, E., Jain, S., Bramley, A. M., Hymas, W., Stockmann, C., ... Erdman, D. D. (2017). Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 216(9), 1104-1111. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix455

Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. / Lu, Xiaoyan; Schneider, Eileen; Jain, Seema; Bramley, Anna M.; Hymas, Weston; Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra; Williams, Derek J.; Self, Wesley H.; Patel, Anami; Chappell, James D.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Mccullers, Jonathan; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Pavia, Andrew T.; Erdman, Dean D.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 216, No. 9, 01.11.2017, p. 1104-1111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lu, X, Schneider, E, Jain, S, Bramley, AM, Hymas, W, Stockmann, C, Ampofo, K, Arnold, S, Williams, DJ, Self, WH, Patel, A, Chappell, JD, Grijalva, CG, Anderson, EJ, Wunderink, RG, Mccullers, J, Edwards, KM, Pavia, AT & Erdman, DD 2017, 'Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 216, no. 9, pp. 1104-1111. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix455
Lu X, Schneider E, Jain S, Bramley AM, Hymas W, Stockmann C et al. Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 Nov 1;216(9):1104-1111. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix455
Lu, Xiaoyan ; Schneider, Eileen ; Jain, Seema ; Bramley, Anna M. ; Hymas, Weston ; Stockmann, Chris ; Ampofo, Krow ; Arnold, Sandra ; Williams, Derek J. ; Self, Wesley H. ; Patel, Anami ; Chappell, James D. ; Grijalva, Carlos G. ; Anderson, Evan J. ; Wunderink, Richard G. ; Mccullers, Jonathan ; Edwards, Kathryn M. ; Pavia, Andrew T. ; Erdman, Dean D. / Rhinovirus viremia in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2017 ; Vol. 216, No. 9. pp. 1104-1111.
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abstract = "Background. Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods. Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Results. Overall, 57 of 570 (10{\%}) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged < 10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2{\%}). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8{\%}), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2{\%}). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. Conclusions. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.",
author = "Xiaoyan Lu and Eileen Schneider and Seema Jain and Bramley, {Anna M.} and Weston Hymas and Chris Stockmann and Krow Ampofo and Sandra Arnold and Williams, {Derek J.} and Self, {Wesley H.} and Anami Patel and Chappell, {James D.} and Grijalva, {Carlos G.} and Anderson, {Evan J.} and Wunderink, {Richard G.} and Jonathan Mccullers and Edwards, {Kathryn M.} and Pavia, {Andrew T.} and Erdman, {Dean D.}",
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AU - Lu, Xiaoyan

AU - Schneider, Eileen

AU - Jain, Seema

AU - Bramley, Anna M.

AU - Hymas, Weston

AU - Stockmann, Chris

AU - Ampofo, Krow

AU - Arnold, Sandra

AU - Williams, Derek J.

AU - Self, Wesley H.

AU - Patel, Anami

AU - Chappell, James D.

AU - Grijalva, Carlos G.

AU - Anderson, Evan J.

AU - Wunderink, Richard G.

AU - Mccullers, Jonathan

AU - Edwards, Kathryn M.

AU - Pavia, Andrew T.

AU - Erdman, Dean D.

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N2 - Background. Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods. Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Results. Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged < 10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. Conclusions. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.

AB - Background. Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods. Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Results. Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged < 10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. Conclusions. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia.

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