Right anterior thoracotomy aortic valve replacement is associated with less cost than sternotomy-based approaches

A multi-institution analysis of 'real world' data

Evelio Rodriguez, S. Chris Malaisrie, John R. Mehall, Matt Moore, Arash Salemi, Gorav Ailawadi, Candace Gunnarsson, Alison F. Ward, Eugene A. Grossi

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Methods: The Premier database was queried from 2007-2011 for clinical and cost data for patients undergoing isoAVR. This de-identified database contains billing, hospital cost, and coding data from >600 US facilities with information from >25 million inpatient discharges. Expert rules were developed to identify patients with RAT and those with any sternal incision (aStern). Propensity matching created groups adjusted for patient differences. The impact of surgical approach on outcomes and costs was modeled using regression analysis and, where indicated, adjusting for hospital size and geographical differences.

    Results: AVR was performed in 27,051 patients. Analysis identified isoAVR by RAT (n=1572) and by aStern (n=3962). Propensity matching created two groups of 921 patients. RAT was more likely performed in southern hospitals (63% vs 36%; p<0.01), teaching hospitals (66% vs 58%; p<0.01) and larger hospitals (47% vs 30%; p<0.01). There was significantly less blood product cost associated with RAT (1381 vs 1912; p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital differences, RAT was associated with lower cost than aStern (38,769 vs 42,656; p<0.01).

    Background: Large institutional analyses demonstrating outcomes of right anterior mini-thoracotomy (RAT) for isolated aortic valve replacement (isoAVR) do not exist. In this study, a group of cardiac surgeons who routinely perform minimally invasive isoAVR analyzed a cross-section of US hospital records in order to analyze outcomes of RAT as compared to sternotomy.

    Conclusions: Outcomes analyses can be performed from hospital administrative collective databases. This real world analysis demonstrates comparable outcomes and less cost and ICU time with RAT for AVR.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)846-852
    Number of pages7
    JournalJournal of Medical Economics
    Volume17
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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    Sternotomy
    Thoracotomy
    Aortic Valve
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Databases
    Health Facility Size
    Hospital Records
    Hospital Costs
    Patient Rights
    Teaching Hospitals
    Inpatients
    Regression Analysis

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Health Policy

    Cite this

    Right anterior thoracotomy aortic valve replacement is associated with less cost than sternotomy-based approaches : A multi-institution analysis of 'real world' data. / Rodriguez, Evelio; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Mehall, John R.; Moore, Matt; Salemi, Arash; Ailawadi, Gorav; Gunnarsson, Candace; Ward, Alison F.; Grossi, Eugene A.

    In: Journal of Medical Economics, Vol. 17, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 846-852.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Rodriguez, Evelio ; Malaisrie, S. Chris ; Mehall, John R. ; Moore, Matt ; Salemi, Arash ; Ailawadi, Gorav ; Gunnarsson, Candace ; Ward, Alison F. ; Grossi, Eugene A. / Right anterior thoracotomy aortic valve replacement is associated with less cost than sternotomy-based approaches : A multi-institution analysis of 'real world' data. In: Journal of Medical Economics. 2014 ; Vol. 17, No. 12. pp. 846-852.
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    abstract = "Methods: The Premier database was queried from 2007-2011 for clinical and cost data for patients undergoing isoAVR. This de-identified database contains billing, hospital cost, and coding data from >600 US facilities with information from >25 million inpatient discharges. Expert rules were developed to identify patients with RAT and those with any sternal incision (aStern). Propensity matching created groups adjusted for patient differences. The impact of surgical approach on outcomes and costs was modeled using regression analysis and, where indicated, adjusting for hospital size and geographical differences.Results: AVR was performed in 27,051 patients. Analysis identified isoAVR by RAT (n=1572) and by aStern (n=3962). Propensity matching created two groups of 921 patients. RAT was more likely performed in southern hospitals (63{\%} vs 36{\%}; p<0.01), teaching hospitals (66{\%} vs 58{\%}; p<0.01) and larger hospitals (47{\%} vs 30{\%}; p<0.01). There was significantly less blood product cost associated with RAT (1381 vs 1912; p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital differences, RAT was associated with lower cost than aStern (38,769 vs 42,656; p<0.01).Background: Large institutional analyses demonstrating outcomes of right anterior mini-thoracotomy (RAT) for isolated aortic valve replacement (isoAVR) do not exist. In this study, a group of cardiac surgeons who routinely perform minimally invasive isoAVR analyzed a cross-section of US hospital records in order to analyze outcomes of RAT as compared to sternotomy.Conclusions: Outcomes analyses can be performed from hospital administrative collective databases. This real world analysis demonstrates comparable outcomes and less cost and ICU time with RAT for AVR.",
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    T1 - Right anterior thoracotomy aortic valve replacement is associated with less cost than sternotomy-based approaches

    T2 - A multi-institution analysis of 'real world' data

    AU - Rodriguez, Evelio

    AU - Malaisrie, S. Chris

    AU - Mehall, John R.

    AU - Moore, Matt

    AU - Salemi, Arash

    AU - Ailawadi, Gorav

    AU - Gunnarsson, Candace

    AU - Ward, Alison F.

    AU - Grossi, Eugene A.

    PY - 2014/12/1

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    AB - Methods: The Premier database was queried from 2007-2011 for clinical and cost data for patients undergoing isoAVR. This de-identified database contains billing, hospital cost, and coding data from >600 US facilities with information from >25 million inpatient discharges. Expert rules were developed to identify patients with RAT and those with any sternal incision (aStern). Propensity matching created groups adjusted for patient differences. The impact of surgical approach on outcomes and costs was modeled using regression analysis and, where indicated, adjusting for hospital size and geographical differences.Results: AVR was performed in 27,051 patients. Analysis identified isoAVR by RAT (n=1572) and by aStern (n=3962). Propensity matching created two groups of 921 patients. RAT was more likely performed in southern hospitals (63% vs 36%; p<0.01), teaching hospitals (66% vs 58%; p<0.01) and larger hospitals (47% vs 30%; p<0.01). There was significantly less blood product cost associated with RAT (1381 vs 1912; p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital differences, RAT was associated with lower cost than aStern (38,769 vs 42,656; p<0.01).Background: Large institutional analyses demonstrating outcomes of right anterior mini-thoracotomy (RAT) for isolated aortic valve replacement (isoAVR) do not exist. In this study, a group of cardiac surgeons who routinely perform minimally invasive isoAVR analyzed a cross-section of US hospital records in order to analyze outcomes of RAT as compared to sternotomy.Conclusions: Outcomes analyses can be performed from hospital administrative collective databases. This real world analysis demonstrates comparable outcomes and less cost and ICU time with RAT for AVR.

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