Right ventricular infarction - Diagnosis and treatment

Showkat Haji, Assad Movahed

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Right ventricular infarction (RVI) as assessed by various diagnostic methods accompanies inferior-posterior wall myocardial infarction (MI) in 30 to 50% of patients. Recognition of the syndrome of RVI is important as it defines a significant clinical entity, which is associated with considerable immediate morbidity and mortality and has a well-delineated set of priorities for its management. Patients may clinically present with hypotension, elevated jugular venous pulse (JVP), and occasionally shock, all in the presence of clear lung fields. The ST-segment elevation of ≥ 0.1 mV in the right precordial leads V4R is a readily available electrocardiographic sign used for diagnosis of RVI. Other diagnostic approaches for assessing RVI include echocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography, technetium pyrophosphate scanning, and hemodynamic measurements. The proper management of RVI includes volume loading to maintain adequate right ventricular preload, ionotropic support, and maintenance of atrioventricular synchrony. Reperfusion therapy should be initiated at the earliest signs of right ventricular dysfunction. Finally, complete recovery over a period of weeks to months is a rule in a majority of patients, suggesting right ventricular 'stunning' rather than irreversible necrosis has occurred.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-482
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Cardiology
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Infarction
Radionuclide Ventriculography
Right Ventricular Dysfunction
Inferior Wall Myocardial Infarction
Therapeutics
Technetium
Patient Rights
Hypotension
Reperfusion
Echocardiography
Shock
Necrosis
Neck
Hemodynamics
Maintenance
Morbidity
Lung
Mortality

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Right ventricular infarction - Diagnosis and treatment. / Haji, Showkat; Movahed, Assad.

In: Clinical Cardiology, Vol. 23, No. 7, 01.01.2000, p. 473-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Haji, Showkat ; Movahed, Assad. / Right ventricular infarction - Diagnosis and treatment. In: Clinical Cardiology. 2000 ; Vol. 23, No. 7. pp. 473-482.
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