Risk factors for development of proteinuria in chronic spinal cord injury

Barry Wall, Kim Huch, T. A. Mangold, E. L. Steers, C. R. Cooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective, case-control study was performed to investigate the risk factors that may contribute to the development of proteinuria in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). During an 18-month period, 31 subjects with a 24-hour protein excretion of 1.0 g or greater were identified. Three control subjects with SCIs with a 24-hour urinary protein excretion of less than 1.0 g during the same time period were randomly selected for each study subject with proteinuria. Clinical data, including level and duration of injury, age, presence of indwelling bladder catheter, number of decubitus ulcer procedures, serum albumin and creatinine concentrations, hematocrit, creatinine clearance, and the presence of hypertension and diabetes mellitus, were obtained from medical records. Subjects with proteinuria had other evidence of renal dysfunction with greater serum creatinine concentrations and reduced creatinine clearances, serum albumin concentrations, and hematocrits. Proteinuric subjects were older, had a longer duration of injury, had undergone a greater number of decubitus ulcer procedures, and were more likely to have hypertension and indwelling bladder catheters. The independent predictors for the development of proteinuria using logistic stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were the use of chronic indwelling bladder catheters, number of decubitis ulcer procedures, presence of hypertension, and older age. These data suggest that inflammatory complications associated with complications of chronic SCI, rather than SCI per se, contribute to the development of proteinuria. SCI patients with proteinuria have more impaired renal function and increased mortality compared with SCI patients without proteinuria.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-903
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Kidney Diseases
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Spinal Cord Injuries
Proteinuria
Indwelling Catheters
Creatinine
Urinary Bladder
Pressure Ulcer
Hypertension
Hematocrit
Serum Albumin
Kidney
Wounds and Injuries
Ulcer
Medical Records
Case-Control Studies
Linear Models
Diabetes Mellitus
Proteins
Regression Analysis
Mortality
Serum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Cite this

Risk factors for development of proteinuria in chronic spinal cord injury. / Wall, Barry; Huch, Kim; Mangold, T. A.; Steers, E. L.; Cooke, C. R.

In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 899-903.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wall, Barry ; Huch, Kim ; Mangold, T. A. ; Steers, E. L. ; Cooke, C. R. / Risk factors for development of proteinuria in chronic spinal cord injury. In: American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 899-903.
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