Risk of abdominal septic complications after feeding jejunostomy placement in patients undergoing splenectomy for trauma

Daniel Dent, Kenneth A. Kudsk, Gayle Minard, Timothy Fabian, Thelinh Nguyen, Elizabeth Pritchard, Linda Pate, Martin Croce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Compared with total parenteral nutrition, enteral feeding via jejunostomy reduces septic complications in patients with severe trauma. However, violation of the bowel with insertion of a jejunostomy tube may increase the risk of intra-abdominal abscess (IAA), particularly if no simultaneous gastrointestinal tract injury exists. The records of 123 patients requiring splenectomy for trauma at a level I trauma center during a 6-year period (1986 to 1992) were reviewed to examine the incidence of IAA in patients with and without simultaneous jejunostomy placement in the presence and absence of gastrointestinal tract injuries. Thirty patients had jejunostomies placed (J), and 93 did not (NoJ). There were no significant differences between the groups in age, Abdominal Trauma Index, Injury Severity Score, or transfusion requirements. The incidence of IAA was not significantly different between the J and NoJ groups in the presence or absence of gastrointestinal tract injuries. Thus, jejunostomy placement does not increase the incidence of IAA after splenectomy regardless of the presence of a gastrointestinal tract injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)686-689
Number of pages4
JournalThe American Journal of Surgery
Volume166
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Jejunostomy
Splenectomy
Abdominal Abscess
Wounds and Injuries
Gastrointestinal Tract
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Trauma Centers
Enteral Nutrition
Age Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Risk of abdominal septic complications after feeding jejunostomy placement in patients undergoing splenectomy for trauma. / Dent, Daniel; Kudsk, Kenneth A.; Minard, Gayle; Fabian, Timothy; Nguyen, Thelinh; Pritchard, Elizabeth; Pate, Linda; Croce, Martin.

In: The American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 166, No. 6, 01.01.1993, p. 686-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dent, Daniel ; Kudsk, Kenneth A. ; Minard, Gayle ; Fabian, Timothy ; Nguyen, Thelinh ; Pritchard, Elizabeth ; Pate, Linda ; Croce, Martin. / Risk of abdominal septic complications after feeding jejunostomy placement in patients undergoing splenectomy for trauma. In: The American Journal of Surgery. 1993 ; Vol. 166, No. 6. pp. 686-689.
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