Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both

Rebekah Harris, Yuefang Chang, Kristen Beavers, Deepika Laddu-Patel, Jennifer Bea, Karen Johnson, Meryl LeBoff, Catherine Womack, Robert Wallace, Wenjun Li, Carolyn Crandall, Jane Cauley

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether women with sarcopenia and low bone mineral density (BMD) are at greater risk of clinical fractures than those with sarcopenia or low BMD alone. Design: Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Clinical trials. Setting: Three U.S. clinical centers (Pittsburgh, PA; Birmingham, AL; Phoenix/Tucson, AZ). Participants: Women (mean age 63.3 ± 0.07) with BMD measurements (N = 10,937). Measurements: Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass values corrected for height and fat mass. Low BMD was defined as a femoral neck T-score less than −1.0 based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference database for white women. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We followed women for incident fractures over a median of 15.9 years. Results: Participants were classified into mutually exclusive groups based on BMD and sarcopenia status: normal BMD and no sarcopenia (n = 3,857, 35%), sarcopenia alone (n = 774, 7%), low BMD alone (n = 4,907, 45%), and low BMD and sarcopenia (n = 1,399, 13%). Women with low BMD, with (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.44–2.06) or without sarcopenia (HR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.37–1.83), had greater risk of fracture than women with normal BMD; the difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for important covariates. Women with low BMD, with (HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.78–4.30 and without (HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.63–3.59) sarcopenia had higher risk of hip fractures. Women with sarcopenia alone had similar HRs to women with normal BMD. Conclusion: Compared to women with normal BMD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2673-2678
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume65
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Sarcopenia
Bone Density
Bone and Bones
Confidence Intervals
Nutrition Surveys
Femur Neck
Hip Fractures
Women's Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Harris, R., Chang, Y., Beavers, K., Laddu-Patel, D., Bea, J., Johnson, K., ... Cauley, J. (2017). Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 65(12), 2673-2678. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15050

Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both. / Harris, Rebekah; Chang, Yuefang; Beavers, Kristen; Laddu-Patel, Deepika; Bea, Jennifer; Johnson, Karen; LeBoff, Meryl; Womack, Catherine; Wallace, Robert; Li, Wenjun; Crandall, Carolyn; Cauley, Jane.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 65, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 2673-2678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harris, R, Chang, Y, Beavers, K, Laddu-Patel, D, Bea, J, Johnson, K, LeBoff, M, Womack, C, Wallace, R, Li, W, Crandall, C & Cauley, J 2017, 'Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 65, no. 12, pp. 2673-2678. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.15050
Harris, Rebekah ; Chang, Yuefang ; Beavers, Kristen ; Laddu-Patel, Deepika ; Bea, Jennifer ; Johnson, Karen ; LeBoff, Meryl ; Womack, Catherine ; Wallace, Robert ; Li, Wenjun ; Crandall, Carolyn ; Cauley, Jane. / Risk of Fracture in Women with Sarcopenia, Low Bone Mass, or Both. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2017 ; Vol. 65, No. 12. pp. 2673-2678.
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abstract = "Objectives: To determine whether women with sarcopenia and low bone mineral density (BMD) are at greater risk of clinical fractures than those with sarcopenia or low BMD alone. Design: Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Clinical trials. Setting: Three U.S. clinical centers (Pittsburgh, PA; Birmingham, AL; Phoenix/Tucson, AZ). Participants: Women (mean age 63.3 ± 0.07) with BMD measurements (N = 10,937). Measurements: Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass values corrected for height and fat mass. Low BMD was defined as a femoral neck T-score less than −1.0 based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference database for white women. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs). We followed women for incident fractures over a median of 15.9 years. Results: Participants were classified into mutually exclusive groups based on BMD and sarcopenia status: normal BMD and no sarcopenia (n = 3,857, 35{\%}), sarcopenia alone (n = 774, 7{\%}), low BMD alone (n = 4,907, 45{\%}), and low BMD and sarcopenia (n = 1,399, 13{\%}). Women with low BMD, with (HR = 1.72, 95{\%} CI = 1.44–2.06) or without sarcopenia (HR = 1.58, 95{\%} CI = 1.37–1.83), had greater risk of fracture than women with normal BMD; the difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for important covariates. Women with low BMD, with (HR = 2.78, 95{\%} CI = 1.78–4.30 and without (HR = 2.42, 95{\%} CI = 1.63–3.59) sarcopenia had higher risk of hip fractures. Women with sarcopenia alone had similar HRs to women with normal BMD. Conclusion: Compared to women with normal BMD.",
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AU - Laddu-Patel, Deepika

AU - Bea, Jennifer

AU - Johnson, Karen

AU - LeBoff, Meryl

AU - Womack, Catherine

AU - Wallace, Robert

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AU - Crandall, Carolyn

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N2 - Objectives: To determine whether women with sarcopenia and low bone mineral density (BMD) are at greater risk of clinical fractures than those with sarcopenia or low BMD alone. Design: Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Clinical trials. Setting: Three U.S. clinical centers (Pittsburgh, PA; Birmingham, AL; Phoenix/Tucson, AZ). Participants: Women (mean age 63.3 ± 0.07) with BMD measurements (N = 10,937). Measurements: Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass values corrected for height and fat mass. Low BMD was defined as a femoral neck T-score less than −1.0 based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference database for white women. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We followed women for incident fractures over a median of 15.9 years. Results: Participants were classified into mutually exclusive groups based on BMD and sarcopenia status: normal BMD and no sarcopenia (n = 3,857, 35%), sarcopenia alone (n = 774, 7%), low BMD alone (n = 4,907, 45%), and low BMD and sarcopenia (n = 1,399, 13%). Women with low BMD, with (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.44–2.06) or without sarcopenia (HR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.37–1.83), had greater risk of fracture than women with normal BMD; the difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for important covariates. Women with low BMD, with (HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.78–4.30 and without (HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.63–3.59) sarcopenia had higher risk of hip fractures. Women with sarcopenia alone had similar HRs to women with normal BMD. Conclusion: Compared to women with normal BMD.

AB - Objectives: To determine whether women with sarcopenia and low bone mineral density (BMD) are at greater risk of clinical fractures than those with sarcopenia or low BMD alone. Design: Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Observational and Clinical trials. Setting: Three U.S. clinical centers (Pittsburgh, PA; Birmingham, AL; Phoenix/Tucson, AZ). Participants: Women (mean age 63.3 ± 0.07) with BMD measurements (N = 10,937). Measurements: Sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass values corrected for height and fat mass. Low BMD was defined as a femoral neck T-score less than −1.0 based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey reference database for white women. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We followed women for incident fractures over a median of 15.9 years. Results: Participants were classified into mutually exclusive groups based on BMD and sarcopenia status: normal BMD and no sarcopenia (n = 3,857, 35%), sarcopenia alone (n = 774, 7%), low BMD alone (n = 4,907, 45%), and low BMD and sarcopenia (n = 1,399, 13%). Women with low BMD, with (HR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.44–2.06) or without sarcopenia (HR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.37–1.83), had greater risk of fracture than women with normal BMD; the difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for important covariates. Women with low BMD, with (HR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.78–4.30 and without (HR = 2.42, 95% CI = 1.63–3.59) sarcopenia had higher risk of hip fractures. Women with sarcopenia alone had similar HRs to women with normal BMD. Conclusion: Compared to women with normal BMD.

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