Risk of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients with peripherally inserted central catheters

Bob L. Lobo, Georgeta Vaidean, Joyce Broyles, Anne Reaves, Ronald I. Shorr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are increasingly used in hospitalized patients. The benefit can be offset by complications such as upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT). METHODS: Retrospective study of patients who received a PICC while hospitalized at the Methodist University Hospital (MUH) in Memphis, TN. All adult consecutive patients who had PICCs inserted during the study period and who did not have a UEDVT at the time of PICC insertion were included in the study. A UEDVT was defined as a symptomatic event in the ipsilateral extremity, leading to the performance of duplex ultrasonography, which confirmed the diagnosis of UEDVT. Pulmonary embolism (PE) was defined as a symptomatic event prompting the performance of ventilation-perfusion lung scan or spiral computed tomography (CT). RESULTS: Among 777 patients, 38 patients experienced 1 or more venous thromboembolisms (VTEs), yielding an incidence of 4.89%. A total of 7444 PICC-days were recorded for 777 patients. This yields a rate of 5.10 VTEs/1000 PICC-days. Compared to patients whose PICC was inserted in the SVC, patients whose PICC was in another location had an increased risk (odds ratio = 2.61 [95% CI = 1.28-5.35]) of VTE. PICC related VTE was significantly more common among patients with a past history of VTE (odds ratio = 10.83 [95% CI = 4.89-23.95]). CONCLUSIONS: About 5% of patients undergoing PICC placement in acute care hospitals will develop thromboembolic complications. Thromboembolic complications were especially common among persons with a past history of VTE. Catheter tip location at the time of insertion may be an important modifiable risk factor.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)417-422
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume4
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

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Venous Thromboembolism
Catheters
Upper Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis
Odds Ratio
Spiral Computed Tomography
Pulmonary Embolism
Ventilation
Ultrasonography
Extremities
Retrospective Studies
Perfusion
Lung
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

Risk of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients with peripherally inserted central catheters. / Lobo, Bob L.; Vaidean, Georgeta; Broyles, Joyce; Reaves, Anne; Shorr, Ronald I.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 7, 01.09.2009, p. 417-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - BACKGROUND: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are increasingly used in hospitalized patients. The benefit can be offset by complications such as upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT). METHODS: Retrospective study of patients who received a PICC while hospitalized at the Methodist University Hospital (MUH) in Memphis, TN. All adult consecutive patients who had PICCs inserted during the study period and who did not have a UEDVT at the time of PICC insertion were included in the study. A UEDVT was defined as a symptomatic event in the ipsilateral extremity, leading to the performance of duplex ultrasonography, which confirmed the diagnosis of UEDVT. Pulmonary embolism (PE) was defined as a symptomatic event prompting the performance of ventilation-perfusion lung scan or spiral computed tomography (CT). RESULTS: Among 777 patients, 38 patients experienced 1 or more venous thromboembolisms (VTEs), yielding an incidence of 4.89%. A total of 7444 PICC-days were recorded for 777 patients. This yields a rate of 5.10 VTEs/1000 PICC-days. Compared to patients whose PICC was inserted in the SVC, patients whose PICC was in another location had an increased risk (odds ratio = 2.61 [95% CI = 1.28-5.35]) of VTE. PICC related VTE was significantly more common among patients with a past history of VTE (odds ratio = 10.83 [95% CI = 4.89-23.95]). CONCLUSIONS: About 5% of patients undergoing PICC placement in acute care hospitals will develop thromboembolic complications. Thromboembolic complications were especially common among persons with a past history of VTE. Catheter tip location at the time of insertion may be an important modifiable risk factor.

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