Role of aldosterone in congestive heart failure

Karl Weber, D. Villarreal

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antialdosterone therapy in patients with secondary hyperaldosteronism due to myocardial failure must accomplish the following: (1) reduce or preferably normalize plasma aldosterone levels by blockade of excessive synthesis, (2) antagonize the renal and systemic effects of aldosterone at its receptor sites, and (3) minimize the presence of multiple stimuli to aldosterone secretion. Fulfillment of these goals likely requires the blockade of angiotensin II-induced aldosterone secretion (ie, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition) with an antagonist of aldosterone receptors (ie, spironolactone [Aldactone]). Despite the potential for hyperkalemia with this combined use of medications, particularly in patients with impaired renal function, such therapy is likely to attenuate the salt-acquisitive state that is characteristic of myocardial failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-207+211
JournalPostgraduate medicine
Volume93
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

Fingerprint

Aldosterone
Heart Failure
Spironolactone
Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists
Kidney
Hyperkalemia
Hyperaldosteronism
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Angiotensin II
Salts
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Role of aldosterone in congestive heart failure. / Weber, Karl; Villarreal, D.

In: Postgraduate medicine, Vol. 93, No. 5, 01.01.1993, p. 203-207+211.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Weber, K & Villarreal, D 1993, 'Role of aldosterone in congestive heart failure', Postgraduate medicine, vol. 93, no. 5, pp. 203-207+211.
Weber, Karl ; Villarreal, D. / Role of aldosterone in congestive heart failure. In: Postgraduate medicine. 1993 ; Vol. 93, No. 5. pp. 203-207+211.
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