Role of angiotensin II in fibrous tissue formation following myocardial infarction

Karl Weber, Yao Sun, Arvinder K. Dhalla, Ramareddy Guntaka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Traditional views of circulating angiotensin (Ang) II have focused on its endocrine properties in classical target tissues (e.g., kidneys and vasculature), where resident cell populations express Ang II receptors. More recent evidence supports its role in nonclassical tissues (e.g., adipose and connective tissues). Moreover, de novo generation and Ang peptides by cellular constituents of these nonclassical tissues has drawn attention to autocrine and paracrine properties of Ang II mediated by AT1 receptor- ligand binding at these sites. Fibrous tissue formation, regulated by phenotypically transformed fibroblast-like cells termed myofibroblasts, represent such nonclassical tissue and cells. Herein we address a role for local Ang II in tissue repair following myocardial infarction. The article further draws attention to the importance of chronic elevations in circulating Ang II, associated with activation of the renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system, that promote unwanted cardiac fibrosis. Genetic risk for adverse cardiovascular structural remodeling and thereby such events as myocardial infarction, stroke, and hypertension may be related to iterations in genes encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensinogen. Potentials for gene therapy that could prevent fibrosis and thereby be cardioprotective are also briefly considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-192
Number of pages10
JournalHeart Failure Reviews
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Angiotensin II
Myocardial Infarction
Fibrosis
Angiotensinogen
Angiotensin Receptors
Myofibroblasts
Angiotensins
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Renin-Angiotensin System
Genetic Therapy
Connective Tissue
Adipose Tissue
Fibroblasts
Stroke
Binding Sites
Ligands
Hypertension
Kidney
Peptides
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Role of angiotensin II in fibrous tissue formation following myocardial infarction. / Weber, Karl; Sun, Yao; Dhalla, Arvinder K.; Guntaka, Ramareddy.

In: Heart Failure Reviews, Vol. 3, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 183-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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