Role of brain IL-1β on fatigue after exercise-induced muscle damage

Martin D. Carmichael, J. Mark Davis, E. Angela Murphy, Adrienne S. Brown, James Carson, Eugene P. Mayer, Abdul Ghaffar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Brain cytokines, induced by various inflammatory challenges, have been linked to sickness behaviors, including fatigue. However, the relationship between brain cytokines and fatigue after exercise is not well understood. Delayed recovery of running performance after muscle-damaging downhill running is associated with increased brain IL-1β concentration compared with uphill running. However, there has been no systematic evaluation of the direct effect of brain IL-1β on running performance after exercise-induced muscle damage. This study examined the specific role of brain IL-1β on running performance (either treadmill or wheel running) after uphill and downhill running by manipulating brain IL-1β activity via intracerebroventricular injection of either IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra; downhill runners) or IL-1β (uphill runners). Male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to the following groups: uphill-saline, uphill-IL-1β, downhill-saline, or downhill-IL-1ra. Mice initially ran on a motor-driven treadmill at 22 m/min and -14% or +14% grade for 150 min. After the run, at 8 h (wheel cage) or 22 h (treadmill), uphill mice received intracerebroventricular injections of IL-1β (900 pg in 2 μl saline) or saline (2 μl), whereas downhill runners received IL-1ra (1.8 μg in 2 μl saline) or saline (2 μl). Later (2 h), running performance was measured (wheel running activity and treadmill run to fatigue). Injection of IL-1β significantly decreased wheel running activity in uphill runners (P < 0.01), whereas IL-1ra improved wheel running in downhill runners (P < 0.05). Similarly, IL-1β decreased and Il-1ra increased run time to fatigue in the uphill and downhill runners, respectively (P < 0.01). These results support the hypothesis that increased brain IL-1β plays an important role in fatigue after muscle-damaging exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume291
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interleukin-1
Running
Fatigue
Muscles
Brain
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein
Injections
Cytokines
Illness Behavior
Muscle Fatigue
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Inbred C57BL Mouse

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Role of brain IL-1β on fatigue after exercise-induced muscle damage. / Carmichael, Martin D.; Davis, J. Mark; Murphy, E. Angela; Brown, Adrienne S.; Carson, James; Mayer, Eugene P.; Ghaffar, Abdul.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 291, No. 5, 24.11.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carmichael, Martin D. ; Davis, J. Mark ; Murphy, E. Angela ; Brown, Adrienne S. ; Carson, James ; Mayer, Eugene P. ; Ghaffar, Abdul. / Role of brain IL-1β on fatigue after exercise-induced muscle damage. In: American Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology. 2006 ; Vol. 291, No. 5.
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