Role of Circulatory disturbances in the development of post-ischemic brain edema

Hiroyuki Masaoka, Igor Klatzo, Shuichi Tomida, Karl Vass, Henry G. Wagner, Thaddeus Nowak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two post-ischemic circulatory disturbances that play a significant role in pathophysiology of an ischemic lesion are: (1) reactive hyperemia or hyperperfusion and (2) hypoperfusion. The reactive hyperemia promptly follows release of major cerebral artery occlusion, and it is associated with the opening of the blood-brain barrier to serum proteins and ensuing edema. Prevention or reduction of reactive hyperemia results in significant amelioration of edema and the resulting ischemic brain tissue injury. The post-ischemic hypoperfusion, studied in gerbils, develops soon after recirculation and usually lasts up to 6 h. Its relationship to post-ischemic edema is evident in repeated ischemic insults. In these studies, three ischemic insults of 5 min duration when applied at 1 h intervals, i.e., during the period of hypoperfusion, resulted in a cumulative effect, post-ischemic edema and tissue injury becoming considerably more pronounced that those following a single 15 min ischemia. There was no cumulative effect when the ischemic insults were spaced 3 min or longer than 6 h apart. These observations indicate that repeated ischemic insults taking place during the phase of post-ischemic hypoperfusion may significantly increase the development of edema and brain tissue injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-29
Number of pages9
JournalNeurochemical Pathology
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Brain Edema
Edema
Hyperemia
Brain Injuries
Cerebral Arteries
Gerbillinae
Blood-Brain Barrier
Blood Proteins
Ischemia
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Role of Circulatory disturbances in the development of post-ischemic brain edema. / Masaoka, Hiroyuki; Klatzo, Igor; Tomida, Shuichi; Vass, Karl; Wagner, Henry G.; Nowak, Thaddeus.

In: Neurochemical Pathology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.07.1988, p. 21-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Masaoka, Hiroyuki ; Klatzo, Igor ; Tomida, Shuichi ; Vass, Karl ; Wagner, Henry G. ; Nowak, Thaddeus. / Role of Circulatory disturbances in the development of post-ischemic brain edema. In: Neurochemical Pathology. 1988 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 21-29.
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