Role of glutamine in protection of intestinal epithelial tight junctions

Radhakrishna Rao, Geetha Samak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glutamine, a conditionally essential amino acid, is consumed predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract as a source of energy, particularly under the conditions of trauma, sepsis and surgery. In this article, we discuss the unique role of glutamine in the preservation of epithelial barrier function in the gastrointestinal tract. Glutamine supplementation protects the gastrointestinal mucosal homeostasis during total parenteral nutrition, diarrhea, radiation injury, starvation, sepsis and trauma. A significant body of evidence indicates that glutamine preserves the gut barrier function and prevents permeability to toxins and pathogens from the gut lumen into mucosal tissue and circulation. Recent studies demonstrated that the mucosal barrier protective effect of glutamine relates to its effect on preservation of epithelial tight junction integrity. The current understanding of glutamine-mediated protection of intestinal epithelial tight junction integrity and the potential mechanisms involved in this protective effect of glutamine are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Epithelial Biology and Pharmacology
Volume5
Issue numberSPEC. ISSUE
StatePublished - Feb 9 2012

Fingerprint

Tight Junctions
Glutamine
Gastrointestinal Tract
Sepsis
Radiation Injuries
Essential Amino Acids
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Wounds and Injuries
Pathogens
Nutrition
Starvation
Surgery
Diarrhea
Permeability
Mucous Membrane
Homeostasis
Radiation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Physiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Role of glutamine in protection of intestinal epithelial tight junctions. / Rao, Radhakrishna; Samak, Geetha.

In: Journal of Epithelial Biology and Pharmacology, Vol. 5, No. SPEC. ISSUE, 09.02.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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