Role of Hyperthermia in Effects of Electroconvulsive Shock on Protein Synthesis in the Rabbit

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Abstract

Abstract: The effects of electroconvulsive shock (ECS) on rectal temperature (TR) and on protein synthesis in brain and liver were compared in rabbit, rat, and mouse. Protein synthesis status was assessed using an in vitro amino acid incorporation method which provides information equivalent to polyribosome profiles. In the rabbit, TR rose from 39.5 ± 0.4°C to 40.4 ± 0.2°C within 10 min following a single ECS, and significant hyperthermia persisted for at least 60 min. This effect was markedly attenuated in animals housed at 4°C. In vitro protein synthesis activities of rabbit brain and liver preparations were significantly reduced following ECS only in those animals whose TR exceeded 40°C. In the rat, ECS gave rise to a significant hyperthermia, but in no case did TR exceed 40°C, and protein synthesis activity of brain supernatants was not affected. In the mouse, ECS reduced TR and had no effect on in vitro protein synthesis activity. These results demonstrate that the unique sensitivity of protein synthesis in rabbit tissues to electroconvulsive shock is a direct consequence of the hyperthermia that arises following ECS in this species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1321-1325
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurochemistry
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1985

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Electroshock
Fever
Rabbits
Temperature
Brain
Proteins
Liver
Rats
Animals
Polyribosomes
Thermodynamic properties
Tissue
Amino Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Role of Hyperthermia in Effects of Electroconvulsive Shock on Protein Synthesis in the Rabbit. / Nowak, Thaddeus.

In: Journal of Neurochemistry, Vol. 44, No. 4, 01.01.1985, p. 1321-1325.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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