Role of T cell subsets in the development of AIDS-associated interstitial pneumonitis in mice

Elizabeth Fitzpatrick, Margarita Avdiushko, Alan M. Kaplan, Donald A. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis (IP), characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the lung and pulmonary dysfunction, is a major noninfectious complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The role of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations and INF-γ in the development of IP were analyzed using a murine model of retroviral-associated IP. Infected mice depleted of CD8+ T cells developed IP similarly to untreated infected mice, suggesting that the CD8+ T cell population does not play a role in IP. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ T cells did not alter the level of viral RNA in lungs, suggesting that cytotoxic T cells may not serve a role in controlling virus burden in lungs. In contrast, depletion of CD4+ T cells in infected mice prevented the development of IP and inhibited inflammatory cytokine expression, suggesting that CD4+ T cells are important for the development of IP. IFN-γ -/- mice infected with virus for 10 weeks developed IP, although the severity of lymphocytic infiltration was substantially reduced compared to infected wild-type mice. The data suggest that persistent viral antigen in the lung may drive a CD4+ T cell-mediated immune response, resulting in the chronic production of IFN-γ which amplifies a chronic inflammatory response in the lung resulting in tissue injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)671-687
Number of pages17
JournalExperimental Lung Research
Volume25
Issue number8
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

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T-cells
Interstitial Lung Diseases
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
T-Lymphocytes
Lung
Viruses
Infiltration
Viral Antigens
Viral RNA
Virus Diseases
Population
HIV
Tissue
Cytokines
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Role of T cell subsets in the development of AIDS-associated interstitial pneumonitis in mice. / Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Avdiushko, Margarita; Kaplan, Alan M.; Cohen, Donald A.

In: Experimental Lung Research, Vol. 25, No. 8, 01.12.1999, p. 671-687.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth ; Avdiushko, Margarita ; Kaplan, Alan M. ; Cohen, Donald A. / Role of T cell subsets in the development of AIDS-associated interstitial pneumonitis in mice. In: Experimental Lung Research. 1999 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 671-687.
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