Role of the gastrointestinal tract in burn sepsis

Ankush Gosain, Richard L. Gamelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the last 50 years, our understanding of the role of the gastrointestinal tract as a first-line defense against the development of postburn sepsis has increased dramatically. Starting with the concept of that gut-derived bacteria cause distant injury, investigators have delineated a complex series of physical changes in the barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Along with an understanding of these physical changes has come an appreciation of the role of the immune system in modulating postburn organ failure. Importantly, recent investigations into the role of mesenteric lymph have fundamentally changed the paradigm of organ failure and have implicated the gut as a cytokine-secreting organ. This article traces the development of key concepts in the study of burn sepsis and their clinical implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-91
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Gastrointestinal Tract
Sepsis
Lymph
Immune System
Research Personnel
Cytokines
Bacteria
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Role of the gastrointestinal tract in burn sepsis. / Gosain, Ankush; Gamelli, Richard L.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation, Vol. 26, No. 1, 01.2005, p. 85-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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