Root resorption during orthodontic therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

External apical root resorption (EARR) is the most common iatrogenic consequence of orthodontics, and orthodontics is the most common cause of EARR. Localized root resorption is a normal and constant remodeling process, a response to oral microtraumas throughout life. Roots do not shorten naturally with age unless forces (eg, bruxism, tongue thrusting) overcompress the periodontal ligament. Appositional repair normally corrects resorptive defects. Irreversible root shortening occurs with excessive forces or decreased resistance to normal forces. Orthodontically induced root resorption starts adjacent to hyalinized zones and occurs during and after elimination of hyalinized tissue. Incisors are most susceptible to EARR, probably because of their roots' spindly apex and because incisors typically are moved farther than other teeth during correction. Intrusion is probably the most detrimental direction of tooth movement, although simply the distance the apex is moved is often correlated with the degree of root shortening. The strongest single association with EARR seems to be a person's genotype. Familial studies show that a person's genotype accounts for about two-thirds of the variation in the extent of periapical resorption. In most instances, this absolves the orthodontist from blame that treatment markedly influenced the extent of resorption, and it also means that a test can be developed that will flag individuals at particular risk of developing EARR. In any event, all patients' root status should be monitored periodically. Rapid resorption can be diminished with slow, intermittent forces with pauses of 2 to 3 months to allow repair of the eroded cementum. (Semin Orthod 2000;6:183-194.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-194
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in Orthodontics
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Root Resorption
Orthodontics
Incisor
Therapeutics
Genotype
Bruxism
Tooth Movement Techniques
Dental Cementum
Periodontal Ligament
Tongue
Tooth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthodontics

Cite this

Root resorption during orthodontic therapy. / Harris, Edward.

In: Seminars in Orthodontics, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 183-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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