Ross River virus replication in cultured mosquito and mammalian cells

Virus growth and correlated ultrastructural changes

Rajendra Raghow, T. D.C. Grace, B. K. Filshie, W. Bartley, L. Dalgarno

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growth of Ross River virus in cultured mosquito (Aedes albopictus) and monkey kidney (Vero) cells shows similar periods (5 to 6 hr) and maximum yields. In Aedes albopictus cells the virus establishes a persistent, non cytopathic infection with no significant change in cell division rate. Virus matures within large, electron dense cytoplasmic inclusions and also at the cell membrane. Virus accumulates within the inclusions but nucleocapsids do not. 'Type 1 cytopathic vacuoles' are not found. Between 40 and 60 hr after infection, the cell associated virus titre falls by 1 log unit. Cytoplasmic inclusions lose electron dense material and are transformed into microvesiculated vacuoles. Virus progressively disappears from these structures and from the cell membrane. It is suggested that during the establishment of the persistent infection, digestion of the contents of the inclusions occurs, resulting from fusion of lysosomal microvesicles with the inclusions. In Vero cells infection leads to cell lysis. Early in infection virus is found in small cytoplasmic vesicles; 'type 1 cytopathic vacuoles' are also present. Accumulation of nucleocapsids is marked, particularly late in infection. Thus, although the pathogenesis of Ross River virus in mice is atypical, its ultrastructural development is similar to that of other alphaviruses in cultured vertebrate cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-122
Number of pages14
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1973
Externally publishedYes

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Ross River virus
Virus Replication
Culicidae
Viruses
Vacuoles
Growth
Nucleocapsid
Infection
Vero Cells
Aedes
Inclusion Bodies
Cell Membrane Structures
Cytoplasmic Vesicles
Electrons
Alphavirus
Satellite Viruses
Virus Diseases
Viral Load
Cell Division
Haplorhini

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Virology

Cite this

Ross River virus replication in cultured mosquito and mammalian cells : Virus growth and correlated ultrastructural changes. / Raghow, Rajendra; Grace, T. D.C.; Filshie, B. K.; Bartley, W.; Dalgarno, L.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.01.1973, p. 109-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raghow, Rajendra ; Grace, T. D.C. ; Filshie, B. K. ; Bartley, W. ; Dalgarno, L. / Ross River virus replication in cultured mosquito and mammalian cells : Virus growth and correlated ultrastructural changes. In: Unknown Journal. 1973 ; Vol. 21, No. 1. pp. 109-122.
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