Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases

R. S. Martin, W. H. Edwards, J. M. Jenkins, W. H. Edwards, J. L. Mulherin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    An 8-year experience with treatment of 58 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) is reviewed with hospital mortality of 25.9 per cent. Added to a previously reported experience, 115 patients have been treated over 25 years with 33 per cent mortality. Preoperative hypotension were found to be associated with mortality. Interhospital transfer, preexisting coronary or pulmonary disease, known aneurysm, anemia, delay in surgery, and operative time were not found to predict outcome. Some patients are normotensive at presentation, providing an excellent chance for survival when expeditious diagnosis and treatment are carried out. Optimal operative management, complications, and causes of death are discussed. The role of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis is considered. Elective resection of known aneurysms is the most important factor in reducing deaths from RAAA. The role of regionalization of care is unclear, since some patients cannot be safely transported. However, some evidence for optimal results in specialized centers is presented.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)539-543
    Number of pages5
    JournalAmerican Surgeon
    Volume54
    Issue number9
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

    Fingerprint

    Aortic Rupture
    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
    Aneurysm
    Preexisting Condition Coverage
    Mortality
    Operative Time
    Hospital Mortality
    Hypotension
    Lung Diseases
    Coronary Disease
    Anemia
    Cause of Death
    Tomography
    Survival
    Therapeutics

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery

    Cite this

    Martin, R. S., Edwards, W. H., Jenkins, J. M., Edwards, W. H., & Mulherin, J. L. (1988). Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases. American Surgeon, 54(9), 539-543.

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm : A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases. / Martin, R. S.; Edwards, W. H.; Jenkins, J. M.; Edwards, W. H.; Mulherin, J. L.

    In: American Surgeon, Vol. 54, No. 9, 01.01.1988, p. 539-543.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Martin, RS, Edwards, WH, Jenkins, JM, Edwards, WH & Mulherin, JL 1988, 'Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases', American Surgeon, vol. 54, no. 9, pp. 539-543.
    Martin RS, Edwards WH, Jenkins JM, Edwards WH, Mulherin JL. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases. American Surgeon. 1988 Jan 1;54(9):539-543.
    Martin, R. S. ; Edwards, W. H. ; Jenkins, J. M. ; Edwards, W. H. ; Mulherin, J. L. / Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm : A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases. In: American Surgeon. 1988 ; Vol. 54, No. 9. pp. 539-543.
    @article{569c52ad0ede4a85879dacf504b4a856,
    title = "Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm: A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases",
    abstract = "An 8-year experience with treatment of 58 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) is reviewed with hospital mortality of 25.9 per cent. Added to a previously reported experience, 115 patients have been treated over 25 years with 33 per cent mortality. Preoperative hypotension were found to be associated with mortality. Interhospital transfer, preexisting coronary or pulmonary disease, known aneurysm, anemia, delay in surgery, and operative time were not found to predict outcome. Some patients are normotensive at presentation, providing an excellent chance for survival when expeditious diagnosis and treatment are carried out. Optimal operative management, complications, and causes of death are discussed. The role of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis is considered. Elective resection of known aneurysms is the most important factor in reducing deaths from RAAA. The role of regionalization of care is unclear, since some patients cannot be safely transported. However, some evidence for optimal results in specialized centers is presented.",
    author = "Martin, {R. S.} and Edwards, {W. H.} and Jenkins, {J. M.} and Edwards, {W. H.} and Mulherin, {J. L.}",
    year = "1988",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    language = "English (US)",
    volume = "54",
    pages = "539--543",
    journal = "American Surgeon",
    issn = "0003-1348",
    publisher = "Southeastern Surgical Congress",
    number = "9",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    T2 - A 25-year experience and analysis of recent cases

    AU - Martin, R. S.

    AU - Edwards, W. H.

    AU - Jenkins, J. M.

    AU - Edwards, W. H.

    AU - Mulherin, J. L.

    PY - 1988/1/1

    Y1 - 1988/1/1

    N2 - An 8-year experience with treatment of 58 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) is reviewed with hospital mortality of 25.9 per cent. Added to a previously reported experience, 115 patients have been treated over 25 years with 33 per cent mortality. Preoperative hypotension were found to be associated with mortality. Interhospital transfer, preexisting coronary or pulmonary disease, known aneurysm, anemia, delay in surgery, and operative time were not found to predict outcome. Some patients are normotensive at presentation, providing an excellent chance for survival when expeditious diagnosis and treatment are carried out. Optimal operative management, complications, and causes of death are discussed. The role of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis is considered. Elective resection of known aneurysms is the most important factor in reducing deaths from RAAA. The role of regionalization of care is unclear, since some patients cannot be safely transported. However, some evidence for optimal results in specialized centers is presented.

    AB - An 8-year experience with treatment of 58 patients with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (RAAA) is reviewed with hospital mortality of 25.9 per cent. Added to a previously reported experience, 115 patients have been treated over 25 years with 33 per cent mortality. Preoperative hypotension were found to be associated with mortality. Interhospital transfer, preexisting coronary or pulmonary disease, known aneurysm, anemia, delay in surgery, and operative time were not found to predict outcome. Some patients are normotensive at presentation, providing an excellent chance for survival when expeditious diagnosis and treatment are carried out. Optimal operative management, complications, and causes of death are discussed. The role of computed tomography (CT) in diagnosis is considered. Elective resection of known aneurysms is the most important factor in reducing deaths from RAAA. The role of regionalization of care is unclear, since some patients cannot be safely transported. However, some evidence for optimal results in specialized centers is presented.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023788386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023788386&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    VL - 54

    SP - 539

    EP - 543

    JO - American Surgeon

    JF - American Surgeon

    SN - 0003-1348

    IS - 9

    ER -