Same content, different methods

Comparing lecture, engaged classroom, and simulation

Meghan F. Raleigh, Garland Wilson, David Alan Moss, Kristen A. Reineke-Piper, Jeffrey Walden, Daniel J. Fisher, Tracey Williams, Christienne Alexander, Brock Niceler, Anthony J. Viera, Todd Zakrajsek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There is a push to use classroom technology and active teaching methods to replace didactic lectures as the most prevalent format for resident education. This multisite collaborative cohort study involving nine residency programs across the United States compared a standard slide-based didactic lecture, a facilitated group discussion via an engaged classroom, and a high-fidelity, hands-on simulation scenario for teaching the topic of acute dyspnea. The primary outcome was knowledge retention at 2 to 4 weeks. METHODS: Each teaching method was assigned to three different residency programs in the collaborative according to local resources. Learning objectives were determined by faculty. Pre- and posttest questions were validated and utilized as a measurement of knowledge retention. Each site administered the pretest, taught the topic of acute dyspnea utilizing their assigned method, and administered a posttest 2 to 4 weeks later. Differences between the groups were compared using paired t-tests. RESULTS: A total of 146 residents completed the posttest, and scores increased from baseline across all groups. The average score increased 6% in the standard lecture group (n=47), 11% in the engaged classroom (n=53), and 9% in the simulation group (n=56). The differences in improvement between engaged classroom and simulation were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to standard lecture, both engaged classroom and high-fidelity simulation were associated with a statistically significant improvement in knowledge retention. Knowledge retention after engaged classroom and high-fidelity simulation did not significantly differ. More research is necessary to determine if different teaching methods result in different levels of comfort and skill with actual patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-105
Number of pages6
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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Teaching
Internship and Residency
Dyspnea
Patient Care
Cohort Studies
Learning
Technology
Education
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Raleigh, M. F., Wilson, G., Moss, D. A., Reineke-Piper, K. A., Walden, J., Fisher, D. J., ... Zakrajsek, T. (2018). Same content, different methods: Comparing lecture, engaged classroom, and simulation. Family Medicine, 50(2), 100-105. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2018.222922

Same content, different methods : Comparing lecture, engaged classroom, and simulation. / Raleigh, Meghan F.; Wilson, Garland; Moss, David Alan; Reineke-Piper, Kristen A.; Walden, Jeffrey; Fisher, Daniel J.; Williams, Tracey; Alexander, Christienne; Niceler, Brock; Viera, Anthony J.; Zakrajsek, Todd.

In: Family Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 100-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raleigh, MF, Wilson, G, Moss, DA, Reineke-Piper, KA, Walden, J, Fisher, DJ, Williams, T, Alexander, C, Niceler, B, Viera, AJ & Zakrajsek, T 2018, 'Same content, different methods: Comparing lecture, engaged classroom, and simulation', Family Medicine, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 100-105. https://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2018.222922
Raleigh, Meghan F. ; Wilson, Garland ; Moss, David Alan ; Reineke-Piper, Kristen A. ; Walden, Jeffrey ; Fisher, Daniel J. ; Williams, Tracey ; Alexander, Christienne ; Niceler, Brock ; Viera, Anthony J. ; Zakrajsek, Todd. / Same content, different methods : Comparing lecture, engaged classroom, and simulation. In: Family Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 100-105.
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